Grays Harbor Historical Seaport

Grays Harbor Historical Seaport

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Thought you might enjoy this. Painted and in art show 'The Treesmiths' in 2014 Nothing is Impossible Janet L. Whitehead 11x14 watercolour on yupo This section of the mainmast of the tall ship Lady Washington, like the majority of the ship, was created with old growth Douglas Fir. In its new role, I wonder, does this mast know how much it has inspired and celebrated my life? Could it feel the energy of me, as much as I could feel the energy of those strong masts, when I climbed aloft and furled sails on a swaying tall ship? As I looked out at sea, seventy-five feet above the deck, did it hear me whisper in complete awe, “Nothing is impossible. Nothing,” knowing that only a few months earlier I had still been in treatment for a serious illness? Surely, the masts knew, the ship knew; because I don’t doubt for a minute that the spirit of that ship in all its wooden glory fed me the energy I needed to pull off this lifelong dream: training as a tall ship sailor.
Taking a great photo of incredible people on an incredible ship in Port Orchard, WA.
Thought I’d share the puzzle I worked this weekend.
I see the Navy is doing a virtual tour of the U.S.S Constitution tomorrow. Love to see one of the Lady.
So a very important message for all crew! A crew member, an alumni crew member is now awaiting test results outside a hospital while having trouble breathing. Mark Olson a huge supporter of the crew of Lady Washington and he needs our support now. Any and all kind words or if you know him a call to boost spirits.
Thanks for boat ride!
what year were the Hawaiian Chieftan and Lady Baltimore historically sailing? 1700's ?
i love you guys!!!! come back to Sausalito
Question: I recently heard that the ships will be coming down to Southern California to Dana Point in December. Does anyone have any conformation dates for this yet???
A fun and educational day on Lady Washington on August 18th, 2019 out of Port Orchard. Photo-bombed by one of the delightful crew members adding to the memory. Thanks for sharing the experience.
This was this past Tuesday I believe. From Deception Pass bridge.
Maybe the Lady and the Chieftain can compete next year!

Visit our website for a full schedule of sailings!

Visit our website for schedule information!

Lady Washington is the official ship of Washington State. She appeared in the movie "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl." Hawaiian Chieftain accompanies Lady Washington on her voyages. Both ships are operated by the non-profit Grays Harbor Historical Seaport Authority, based in Aberdeen, Wash. The ships specialize in hands-on history education for elementary school students.

Mission: To promote and preserve our maritime history and traditions.

Best cure for a case of the Mondays? Set more sail! Here you can see our main royal, maintopmast stays’l, and main stays’l flying.

📸Patrick Foley
#ladywashington #tallships #briglife #sailing #squarerigger #allwoodallgood

Some of our crew will be seeing Lady Washington from a whole new perspective when she is hauled out two weeks from now. You know there’s that much hull in the water because you live in it, but it can certainly be surprising the first time you see it!

What was a time when you were suddenly assaulted with the size of an object or issue?

Ships often test your sense of perspective. One such situation are the periodic times when they are out of the water. When you’re on board they can sometimes imply a sense of smallness and confinement. The opposite impression attacks you at first sight out of the water. Especially when underneath looking up.

Here, four of the ships in the Park’s collection are seen in drydock or indoors during periods of maintenance and restoration. From left to right, top to bottom they are the full-rigged ship Balclutha, schooner C.A. Thayer, steam tug Hercules, and ferryboat Eureka.

Do you ever get that fluttery feeling when you think about sailing? We sure do! 😍



📸Halee Grimes⠀
#ladywashington #sailing #squarerigged #briglife #pnw #tallship

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Grays Harbor Historical Seaport

We’ve got a math question for you this morning! Lady Washington has approximately 4,000 square feet of exterior hull space. Roughly half is below the waterline. Because of this we use two different types of paint, an oil based enamel on the topsides, and a growth inhibiting bottom paint for underneath the surface. When added together, the cost of paint averages out to around $100 per gallon. A gallon of paint covers approximately 400 square feet and we always apply two coats during yard periods. So here’s the question: How much are we going to spend to paint Lady Washington during her bi-annual haul-out this June?

And here’s our next question: Would you like to help us cover that cost? Paint not only keeps the ship looking nice, but it helps keep her protected from the elements. It’s a necessary expense, and despite not being open to the public this spring as planned, we still have to pay it to ensure Lady Washington can continue to sail for you in the coming years.

Donate now: https://secure.donorpro.com/ghhs

Photos from 2018 Haul-out

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#ladywashington #squaresails #squarerigger #rigging

Setting Heads'ls

Setting the stays'l and jib aboard Lady Washington during very light airs, April 2020. To set these sails we cast off the downhauls, haul on the halyards, and tend the sheets. When the luff of the sail is tight, the halyard is made fast and the sheets are adjusted for proper sail shape.

Taking in Heads'ls

Taking in the Stays'l and Jib after a day of light airs sailing, April 2020.

To take in these sails we ease the halyard while hauling on the downhaul. At the same time someone is also tending the sheets, taking up or easing as needed to keep the sail under control.

It's class time again!

Lady Washington has several fore and aft sails, but today we’ll focus on the jib and foretopmast stays’l, which together are known simply as “the heads’ls” because they are set at the head of the ship! These two sails are triangular shaped, with a long leading edge. These two fore and aft sails are a bit simpler than our squares’ls, but just as important for ship maneuvers. They are a more modern style of sail than the square sail, and were just coming into common usage on larger vessels during Lady Washington’s time period. They will be very familiar if you’ve seen a schooner or a modern sailboat.

The foretopmast stays’l is named as such because it sets on the fore topmast stay. This is a heavy piece of standing rigging that keeps forward tension on the foretopmast. We usually just call this sail the “stays’l”, even though we have three stays’ls in total (we also have a main stays’l and a maintopmast stays’l), because it’s the one we set most often. The jib is called as such because it sets on the jib stay, a piece of standing rigging which provides upward tension for the jibboom.

As far as parts of the sail go, some of the names may sound familiar: The long leading edge of the sail is called the luff, the bottom is called the foot, the after edge is called the leech, the top corner is called the head, the bottom forward corner attached to the jibboom is called the tack, and the bottom aft corner is called the clew. The luff of the sail is the edge that is attached to the stay. We use U-shaped wooden pieces called hanks to attach it. The hanks are seized around the stay and then lashed to the luff of the sail. The hanks are what allow the sail to ride up and down the stay when it is set and taken in. The tack is attached to the spar with a lashing simply called the tack lashing.

Each heads’l has a halyard, a downhaul, and two sheets. And that’s it for running rigging! The halyard and the downhaul are both attached to the head of the sail, but they are opposites. The halyard runs up through a block on the mast and then back down to deck. The downhaul runs from the head of the sail, down through the hanks to a block at the bottom of the stay, and then into deck. The sheets are led through blocks that are on a pendant attached to the clew; one sheet goes to either side. Just like the squares’ls, the halyard hauls the sail up. Unlike the squares’ls, there’s only one line, the downhaul, to pull the sail back down, and the sheets are used to adjust sail trim for better flow.

The heads’ls are furled and have to be loosed before we can set them. To set the jib or stays’l we cast off the downhaul, make sure the sheets are loose and then haul on the halyard. The first command will be “hands to set the heads'ls” at which point downhauls are cast off, sheets are eased or cast off and held, and the halyard is ready to be pulled. The next command is simply “set the jib/stays’l/heads’ls!” so the crew hauls on the halyard until the luff is nice and tight until they hear “that’s well”, then the haul on the leeward sheet until the sail is filling nicely, belay it, and then it’s done! To take in the sails we just cast off the halyard, ease the sheets, and haul on the downhaul at the command, "take in heads'ls.”

Stay tuned for a video upload of our heads'ls at work!

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Grays Harbor Historical Seaport's cover photo

Lady Washington was built by her community. We hope to continue offering views like this to that community for years to come. We need your support to make it happen! It’s #GivingTuesdayNow!

What have we been up to lately? Well, all sorts! A lot of maintenance, a bit of training, and a few days of sailing. We’ve been working hard to paint, oil, tar, and varnish when it’s dry and warm out. On rainy days we’ve been doing crew training involving sail theory, navigation, parts of our education program and various other topics.

Grays Harbor Historical Seaport

Today is the day! It’s finally Giving Tuesday! Your donations will allow us to continue offering hands-on historical education and adventure to the communities we visit. It's because of you that we're here, and it's for you that we hope to keep sailing!⠀


#GivingTuesdayNow #givingtuesday #ladywashington #givelocal #supportnonprofits

Today is the day! It’s finally Giving Tuesday! Your donations will allow us to continue offering hands-on historical education and adventure to the communities we visit. It's because of you that we're here, and it's for you that we hope to keep sailing!⠀


#GivingTuesdayNow #givingtuesday #ladywashington #givelocal #supportnonprofits

#GivingTuesdayNow is tomorrow! Support your local non-profits on this global day of giving so that they can continue giving back to you!

#givingtuesday #givingback

#GivingTuesday is just 3 days away! We're all having a hard time navigating this global crisis; your generosity on May 5th will help organizations like us find our way through it. We hope to sail with you all again soon!⠀

#GivingTuesdayNow

We're all having a hard time during the global COVID-19 pandemic, but a small donation from amazing supporters like you could be a huge help to non-profits like us in this time of crisis. We love to give back to the communities we visit and we hope you'll give back to us and your other local organizations on Tuesday, May 5th! Just 5 days to go until #GivingTuesdayNow

We wanted to share some great shots of Lady Washington’s frames going up during construction. The frames of a ship act just like a rib cage, giving shape to the hull and protecting what’s inside, which in this case is the crew!

#ladywashington #allwoodallgood #shipconstruction #woodboat #shipwright

Governor Inslee announced Monday that some recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, and state parks will reopen beginning May 5th. What does this mean for us? While we’re not going to be open to the public just yet, it does mean we’re one step closer to welcoming our wonderful supporters back on board Lady Washington. It’s going to take time, but we’re all in this together, and you’ve all been doing an amazing job of staying home and staying safe. We’re so proud of our home state, and we can’t wait to take you all out sailing again!

Grays Harbor Historical Seaport's cover photo

One week to go until #GivingTuesday! On May 5th your donations will help non-profit organizations like us to continue giving back to our communities. Thank you for always supporting us, we are all in this together!

📸Cooper Carras
#GivingTuesdayNow #ladywashington #experientialeducation #experientiallearning

Sometimes you need a helping hand! Tightening the earring lashing on the main royal.

#ladywashington #briglife #allwoodallgood #sailtallships #traditionalrigging #squaresails #tallships #sailing

Have you heard the news? In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, the date for #GivingTuesday has been pushed up to May 5th. As you know, Lady Washington has been closed to the public all spring, meaning we haven't made any money. A small crew has remained onboard continuing maintenance, but supplies are expensive. In addition to regularly used supplies such as paint, varnish, paintbrushes, and gloves, Lady Washington is in need of some new running rigging and a fresh coat of bottom paint during her yard period this June. You all do so much to keep us afloat, and we could really use that tremendous love now. #GivingTuesdayNow

Grays Harbor Historical Seaport

We’ve decided to do a whole series about Lady Washington’s sails, rigging, education programming, and other parts of life on board. So stay tuned into our page, this is just the first video of many!

Welcome back to Part 2 of Squares'l Class!

So how do we set our sails? How does the crew seem to know exactly what to do? Well, mostly it comes down to practice. Like we said in Part 1 yesterday, setting a squares'l happens in two stages: First, the bottom of the sail is pulled down to the lower yard, and then the top yard is pulled up to stretch the sail out vertically. This all happens with several commands from the mate that signal the crew when to do what. Let’s pick up the routine after all sails have been loosed and are hanging in their gear:

“Hands to set the main tops'l!” – The coils for all lines are put on deck, crew standby the gear (reeflines, buntlines, and clewlines) and the sheets.

“Sheet home!” – The gear is cast off and allowed to run free and the sheets are hauled until the clews of the sail are at the lower yard. The gear, particularly the clewlines, work opposite the sheets, so if we don’t cast it off, then nothing happens when we haul on the sheets.

“That’s well, hands to halyard!” – The sheets are made off, the gear is left slack, and the crew all goes to the halyard and gets ready to pull together. (Many sea shanties are specifically halyard shanties with a rhythm that signals everyone to pull in unison.)

“Haul away halyard!” – Everyone pulls together on the halyard. It’s really heavy because they are pulling up the weight of the yard and the sail until the sail is stretched tall and tight.

“That’s well!” – The halyard is made fast and setting is all done! The crew will either set more sail or start to clean up the deck by coiling and putting away all the lines.

“Taking in” the tops’ls is basically doing all of the above but in the opposite order. If we wanted to take in all sail really quickly (For example, if there was a squall moving our way) the mate would use the command “strike” which signals the crew that the sail needs to come down in a hurry. But let's go through a typical end of sail routine:

“Hands to take in the main tops’l!” – Coils are placed back on deck; one crew member gets ready to ease the halyard while the rest get ready to pull down on the gear (clewlines, buntlines, reeflines).

“Clew down!” – The halyard is eased while the clewlines are pulled. They go through a block attached to the yard and therefore help pull it back down until the yard is hanging in its lifts.

“Clew up!” – The sheets are cast off and crew continues to haul on the clewlines which are now pulling the clews of the sail up towards the top yard. The reeflines and buntlines are also being hauled to bring the sail up and in towards the top yard.

At this point, the crew either takes in more sail or climbs aloft to furl. After every day of sailing, the crew isn’t done working until the ship is “put to bed” meaning that all the sails are furled, all the lines are coiled and hung on their pins, and all other items are stowed away.

Setting and Taking in Squares'ls

Welcome back to Part 2 of Squares'l Class!

So how do we set our sails? How does the crew seem to know exactly what to do? Well, mostly it comes down to practice. Like we said in Part 1 yesterday, setting a squares'l happens in two stages: First, the bottom of the sail is pulled down to the lower yard, and then the top yard is pulled up to stretch the sail out vertically. This all happens with several commands from the mate that signal the crew when to do what. Let’s pick up the routine after all sails have been loosed and are hanging in their gear:

“Hands to set the main tops'l!” – The coils for all lines are put on deck, crew standby the gear (reeflines, buntlines, and clewlines) and the sheets.

“Sheet home!” – The gear is cast off and allowed to run free and the sheets are hauled until the clews of the sail are at the lower yard. The gear, particularly the clewlines, work opposite the sheets, so if we don’t cast it off, then nothing happens when we haul on the sheets.

“That’s well, hands to halyard!” – The sheets are made off, the gear is left slack, and the crew all goes to the halyard and gets ready to pull together. (Many sea shanties are specifically halyard shanties with a rhythm that signals everyone to pull in unison.)

“Haul away halyard!” – Everyone pulls together on the halyard. It’s really heavy because they are pulling up the weight of the yard and the sail until the sail is stretched tall and tight.

“That’s well!” – The halyard is made fast and setting is all done! The crew will either set more sail or start to clean up the deck by coiling and putting away all the lines.

“Taking in” the tops’ls is basically doing all of the above but in the opposite order. If we wanted to take in all sail really quickly (For example, if there was a squall moving our way) the mate would use the command “strike” which signals the crew that the sail needs to come down in a hurry. But let's go through a typical end of sail routine:

“Hands to take in the main tops’l!” – Coils are placed back on deck; one crew member gets ready to ease the halyard while the rest get ready to pull down on the gear (clewlines, buntlines, reeflines).

“Clew down!” – The halyard is eased while the clewlines are pulled. They go through a block attached to the yard and therefore help pull it back down until the yard is hanging in its lifts.

“Clew up!” – The sheets are cast off and crew continues to haul on the clewlines which are now pulling the clews of the sail up towards the top yard. The reeflines and buntlines are also being hauled to bring the sail up and in towards the top yard.

At this point, the crew either takes in more sail or climbs aloft to furl. After every day of sailing, the crew isn’t done working until the ship is “put to bed” meaning that all the sails are furled, all the lines are coiled and hung on their pins, and all other items are stowed away.

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Videos (show all)

Taking in Heads'ls
Setting Heads'ls
Setting and Taking in Squares'ls
Come Aboard!
Adventure/Battle Sails Promo
GHHS Promo Sneak Peak
Gabriel Wheaton - Alive

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500 N Custer St, PO Box 2019
Aberdeen, WA
98520
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