Takano Weightlifting

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Product Launch Checkout 02/09/2024

COACHING DEMEANOR: AFFECTING THE LIFT

All mammals communicate through unspoken language. Human youngsters whose language skills are not fully developed also communicate largely through body language. The rest of us do it probably more frequently than we realize, oftentimes with unexpected results.
I like to watch weightlifting competitions. I’ll watch sessions where I’m not coaching, just to see how they transpire and perhaps to pick up on perspectives that I might otherwise miss. We’ve never had such a period in the history of U.S. weightlifting where we’ve had so many new lifters being coached by so many new coaches.
One phenomenon I’ve taken note of recently is the effect of coaches’ body language on the performance of the athlete.
• Veteran, experienced coaches know precisely what they’re doing during the time that their athletes are on the competition platform. They act decisively, make good decisions promptly and show that they are in control of the performance. They expect that every attempt will be successful. They don’t hesitate about how much to increase for the next attempt, whether to repeat after a miss and control the mindset of their charges. This demonstration of efficacy can be perceived by the officials and the audience. More importantly the confidence of a coach can affect the approach of the athlete.
• Less experienced coaches assume a hopeful posture. They are also more indecisive and their body language reflects this. They are also less likely to accurately calculate the amount of time until their athlete’s next attempt and what to do in the interim. This transfers to their athlete often without the athlete even being aware.
New coaches can avoid some of this detrimental body language by having a plan for the competition. This means knowing what the athlete is capable of and having the expectation that he or she will be successful. The best athletes don’t dwell on failures. Nothing can be done about failures after they’ve occurred. The coach can, however, take note of technical faults in a failure and provide direction that will avoid them on the next attempt should one be available. The coach should be masterful in distracting the athlete away from a failure and getting him or her to focus on the next attempt. No time for lamenting here because it isn’t helpful.
The coach’s posture at the side of the platform will let the athlete know if he or she is confident in the preparation, both physical and psychological, and whether the expectations are for success. You don’t have to be overbearing, but focused and full of expectation.
A coach may have a greater than expected influence on the outcome. A realization of this perspective will go a long way towards successful platform coaching.

if you're in need of a plan for learning weightlifting technique or training programs for Beginners, Intermediates and Advanced, you can sign-up for a free 14 day trial of my latest membership site, Takano BarTech at

Product Launch Checkout

The Myth of Being "Muscle Bound" | SportsEdTV 02/08/2024

My Weekly SportsEdTV Weightlifting Blog

The Myth of Being "Muscle Bound" | SportsEdTV The historical misconception that weightlifting leads to being "muscle bound" has been debunked, emphasizing its comprehensive benefits for athletic performance.

Product Launch Checkout 02/03/2024

SUPPLEMENTAL EXPLOSIVENESS TRAINING

The ability to rapidly extend the knees and hips is absolutely essential for generating an explosive pull. These movements are enabled by pushing off on the ball of the foot. Athletes can develop leg explosiveness by including short sprints and jumping exercises in their training.
When training the lifters I’ve coached, I’ve regularly included sprints, jumping and one-legged hopping in the programming.
Once or twice a week, I will have my athletes perform 5-6 sprints of 15 meters from either a supine or a prone position. Starting from these positions also helps to develop the speed of hip flexion which is helpful when dropping rapidly into a full squat during sn**ching or cleaning.
I also like to add horizontal one-legged hopping. This involves performing 4 or 5 consecutive hops on the left leg, followed by 4 or 5 consecutive hops on the right leg. Once or twice a week after the weightlifting session is adequate for developing leg explosiveness.
At other times, I will superset vertical jumps with Back Squats. A set of four reps in the back squat followed immediately upon racking the bar with a set of 4 vertical jumps is the usual prescription. This combination finds the back squats fatiguing many motor units, thus forcing other less stimulated motor units to be recruited. These might be programmed twice a month.
Sprinting, hopping and jumping are an excellent way for lifters to learn how to push off the ball of the foot, and to become more explosive. Remember that when performing a pull, speed becomes height.

Don’t forget to sign-up for your free 14 day trial to the Takano BarTech membership site which will provide you with training program information for all levels of weightlifting proficiency. Just go to https://takanoweightliftingcoaching.net/vsl-order-form3qnol597 in order to sign up.

Product Launch Checkout

Product Launch Checkout 01/31/2024

STAGES OF COACHING FEEDBACK

So many people these days are getting involved in learning the sn**ch and clean & jerk without any clear guidance. That’s fine. It has been that way ever since weightlifting was introduced to the general population back in the post World War I era. The sale of home exercise equipment was just getting started and each barbell set came with some printed instructions. There were a few books and periodicals that provided some instruction, but most people anxious to start weightlifting were pretty much on their own. Since there was very little weightlifting covered by motion pictures, the only way that a newcomer could actually see how a competition lift might be performed was to attend an actual weightlifting competition.
With the advent of the internet and the ease with which video capture can take place, things are quite a bit better than they used to be in the pre-digital era.
I’m seeing more and more novices posting their lifts online and asking for feedback. This is a step forward as asking for assistance represents an openness on the part of these new lifters. What I’d like to do here is make people aware of the stages of coaching assistance. This is both for the benefit of the lifters and for developing coaches.
The first and most obvious stage is to identify a technical error. As an example let’s take a lifter who has provided a video or videos of a sn**ch. The problem that appears is that the lifter jumps forward while descending into the squat. This results in the bar landing in a position that may be too far back to control and the lifter ends up dropping the weight behind. Most of the feedback for the video spot this problem. The lifter may or may not be aware of this technique flaw so at this point it is probably helpful.
A more seasoned coach might make the next diagnosis of the problem on top of identifying it. The lifter has his/her center of pressure on the heel at the point of hip and knee extension. This means that there is insufficient downward pressure on the feet and as the hips come forward, the momentum causes a jumping forward into a receiving position. This is helpful for the lifter as it sheds more light on the problem, but does not specifically recommend a remedy.
An experienced coach will prescribe an exercise to solve the problem. I would recommend performing sn**ches from blocks with the bar set at power position. I would caution the athlete to make sure that the center of pressure is on the ball of the foot at the initiation of the movement and to achieve full extension of the knees and hips and plantar flexion of the ankles before beginning the descent.
What I’ve provided here are the different levels of advice that can be provided. The advice provided by the experienced coach can save time in the developmental process and that is something that all lifters should strive for.
if you're in need of a plan for learning weightlifting technique or training programs for Beginners, Intermediates and Advanced, you can sign-up for a free 14 day trial of my latest membership site, Takano BarTech at

Product Launch Checkout

01/31/2024

STAGES OF COACHING FEEDBACK

So many people these days are getting involved in learning the sn**ch and clean & jerk without any clear guidance. That’s fine. It has been that way ever since weightlifting was introduced to the general population back in the post World War I era. The sale of home exercise equipment was just getting started and each barbell set came with some printed instructions. There were a few books and periodicals that provided some instruction, but most people anxious to start weightlifting were pretty much on their own. Since there was very little weightlifting covered by motion pictures, the only way that a newcomer could actually see how a competition lift might be performed was to attend an actual weightlifting competition.
With the advent of the internet and the ease with which video capture can take place, things are quite a bit better than they used to be in the pre-digital era.
I’m seeing more and more novices posting their lifts online and asking for feedback. This is a step forward as asking for assistance represents an openness on the part of these new lifters. What I’d like to do here is make people aware of the stages of coaching assistance. This is both for the benefit of the lifters and for developing coaches.
The first and most obvious stage is to identify a technical error. As an example let’s take a lifter who has provided a video or videos of a sn**ch. The problem that appears is that the lifter jumps forward while descending into the squat. This results in the bar landing in a position that may be too far back to control and the lifter ends up dropping the weight behind. Most of the feedback for the video spot this problem. The lifter may or may not be aware of this technique flaw so at this point it is probably helpful.
A more seasoned coach might make the next diagnosis of the problem on top of identifying it. The lifter has his/her center of pressure on the heel at the point of hip and knee extension. This means that there is insufficient downward pressure on the feet and as the hips come forward, the momentum causes a jumping forward into a receiving position. This is helpful for the lifter as it sheds more light on the problem, but does not specifically recommend a remedy.
An experienced coach will prescribe an exercise to solve the problem. I would recommend performing sn**ches from blocks with the bar set at power position. I would caution the athlete to make sure that the center of pressure is on the ball of the foot at the initiation of the movement and to achieve full extension of the knees and hips and plantar flexion of the ankles before beginning the descent.
What I’ve provided here are the different levels of advice that can be provided. The advice provided by the experienced coach can save time in the developmental process and that is something that all lifters should strive for.

Maximizing Grip Strength in Weightlifting: Essential Techniques and Practices | SportsEdTV 01/25/2024

Here's my latest post addressing grip strength for lifters. https://sportsedtv.com/blog/maximizing-grip-strength-in-weightlifting-essential-techniques-and-practices
If you're in need of a plan for learning weightlifting technique or training programs for Beginners, Intermediates and Advanced, you can sign-up for a free 14 day trial of my latest membership site, Takano BarTech at https://takanoweightliftingcoaching.net/vsl-order-form3qnol597.

Maximizing Grip Strength in Weightlifting: Essential Techniques and Practices | SportsEdTV Enhancing grip strength in Olympic weightlifting involves performing hang sn**ches and cleans without straps, and not lowering the bar to the platform between reps.

01/24/2024

DILETTANTES AND LIFESTYLERS

Most people who become involved in the practice of the sn**ch and clean & jerk start out as dilettantes (dabblers so to speak). Their justifications for learning the lifts may be somewhat varied. They may develop passable technique. They may train somewhat regularly. They might even enter some competitions. They do not, however, have plans to move out of their comfort zones in order to pursue excellence in the sport. They have always been around.
On the other hand there are lifestylers. Lifestylers will do whatever it takes to find out how much weight they can lift. They will pick up and move to a city where there is an elite level gym. They will pass up buying a new car to have enough money to travel to national and even international events. They will share an apartment, get a job in a buffet, and figure out what they have to do to feed the addiction. They will find a life partner who is willing to support their habit. At one time they were influential in the development of the value system in the sport.
What has changed over the last decade is that the dilettantes have developed a voice that influences the culture of the sport. Social media has enabled this along with the fact that dilettantes will spend more money collectively on accoutrements than elite lifestylers. This will end up influencing the zeitgeist of U.S. weightlifting in the 2020’s. Who knows where that will lead?

01/15/2024

CEREBRAL INPUT OVERLOAD DURING PERFORMANCE EX*****ON

During the course of the performance of the sn**ch or clean (which should not exceed 1.5 seconds), the sensory cortex is receiving a significant number of proprioceptive inputs from the muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones involved in the ex*****on. All of this input is interpreted and reacted upon by then sending action potentials to the end organs involved.
This is a lot of neural activity and to perform a well executed lift, it must all take place quickly, precisely and sequentially accurately.
Why make this process that much more difficult by concurrently flooding the brain with auditory signals?
Gym managers that insist on playing loud music or people who wear headphones while sn**ching, cleaning and jerking just don’t get it. Too complicated for them.
Playing music while doing bodybuilding movements is understandable as there is not much neuromotor activity taking place. Also this type of training can be pretty boring.
Weightlifting training, however, is a different affair. It requires achieving an altered state with no disruption. No matter how much dialogue is taking place on line, there is preciously little conversation about achieving the altered state.
So don’t post videos asking for technique critiques while wearing headphones. You don’t appreciate the complexity of the process enough to show respect by eliminating the musical disruption.

01/11/2024

GET PAST VOCABULARY AND COLLABORATE!

I see quite a few postings on line by individuals anxious to establish themselves as knowledgeable contributors to weightlifting discussions. Nothing wrong with that. I can tell, however, by their postings that most of them are not being as thoughtful about observing their coaching results as they need to be. They’ve mastered the jargon of sport science associated with weightlifting, but not the insightfulness that is developed by rumination over results and collaboration with other practitioners.
Some of my best a-ha moments took place as a result of discussions with other coaches (and not just weightlifting coaches). They were almost always informal affairs taking place at national events. Weightlifting coaches are like any other groups, always seeking out kindred spirits. Oftentimes they started out as storytelling sessions, but inevitably someone would come up with an insightful observation that would generate more participation that would inspire us to want to modify some aspect of our coaching.
So if you are a novice coach enthusiastic about enhancing your education, you should plan on moving past the basic principles and jargon, and start doing the things that will make you a better practitioner. Write programming, watch your athletes train and ruminate about the results. Engage in conversation and interactions with other practitioners and be open to possibilities. Try new strategies that make sense.
There is no playbook for coaching development in this country beyond the USAW L2.
Weightlifting is a competitive sport and all the participants should be aspiring to be the best they can be. That applies not only to athletes, but to coaches as well. Coaches should not be content to be kinda OK, but the most effective they can be.

01/05/2024

Richard LaFleur’s Finger—Weightlifting Tales

Back in the 70’s when I was a member of Mav-rik Lifters, we had a pretty good junior 67.5 k lifter named Rich LaFleur. He was a hard working kid and was involved in a vocational ed program to become a cabinet maker. One day he had an accident while using a router, a power carpentry tool used to cut grooves in wood among other functions.
This resulted in a bloody gash in his middle finger. After a quick trip to the Emergency Room, Rich came away with a heavily bandaged digit that he had to hold above eye level to prevent a pooling of fluid.
So for a couple of weeks Rich had to walk around, including to workouts, holding his bandaged middle finger up in the air. This generated many comments.

12/25/2023

Merry Christmas to all!

12/19/2023

GOAL SETTING

One of the tasks of a coach is to encourage progress since individuals making progress are more likely to maintain the enthusiasm of a weightlifting club. Setting goals in competition is one of the best ways to develop group enthusiasm for the sport. It requires a bit of record keeping but is well worth the effort as it will keep athletes showing up for training regularly. Here are some of the goal setting tools I’ve used with varying degrees of success.
Personal records (PR’s): These are the most tangible and clear indicators of progress. One of my former athletes, Tom DiFilippi used to call PR’s world records. According to his reasoning a lift of X number of kilos had never been done in this world by this lifter and hence it was a world record.
New Bodyweight Class PR’s: Going up a weight class can be especially rewarding as it often provides new opportunities for PR’s.
New Age Group PR’s. New age group PR’s are available to youth and junior athletes as they matriculate through the system. Master athletes are also quite aware that they are most likely to set age group PR’s at the threshold of a new age group.
New WSO records: Every WSO should have a records chairman who should make the records readily updated and available to provide targets for competitors at each WSO competition. WSO’s should also establish rules and policies for the setting of records. Some WSO’s have traditionally counted records only set within the geographic boundaries of the WSO. Others will accept WSO records exceeded at national and international events outside the boundaries.
New Club Records: I’ve always kept club records as targets for my lifters. These can be strong incentives as some of them are quite historic. Every coach should be keeping up-to-date club records.
WSO Rankings: Each WSO should keep up to date ranking lists as lifters will enjoy seeing their performances moving up the list. Another good indicator of progress.
Club Rankings: Each club should keep ranking lists for each age group and weight class. As time goes on, some club records may be unattainable, but moving up the ranking lists is more achievable.
National Event qualifiers: These are reasonable goals for the more experienced and talented team members.
All of these goals will help to keep your athletes invested and help to maintain your own enthusiasm as a coach.

Product Launch Checkout 12/14/2023

THE TWO BIG OBSTACLES FOR BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE LIFTERS/COACHES

I’m all too frequently confronted with the realities faced by beginning and intermediate lifters as they try to navigate the pathway to a rewarding weightlifting career. When coaching new athletes or teaching USAW courses most of the questions and queries deal with the development of proficient technique and how to program training to keep progress going.
This is to be expected and it’s not surprising that the answers are not readily available. Newer or less experienced coaches also have to be deal with these stumbling blocks, so I’ve tried to provide some guidance and information for lifters and coaches seeking answers.
THE OVERVIEW OF THE PATHWAY
There is an optimal path for the development of weightlifting proficiency. The initial or beginning phase should be largely dedicated to mastering technique while developing strength and speed characteristics of the body. Once technique is developed to a certain proficiency and the body can accommodate the rigors of regular training, the secondary phase can commence. This secondary phase emphasizes the refinement of technique mastery, while increasing strength, speed and the ability to train more rigorously.
THE STUMBLING BLOCKS OF TECHNIQUE TRAINING
There are some sources of technique training available such as the USAW L1 course or some books and many snippets of information available online. Unfortunately many novice lifters do not have access to a full, comprehensive knowledge of the many events that take place during the ex*****on of the sn**ch and clean & jerk. This is why there are so many queries online about relatively basic events during the performance of the lifts. Secondarily there is even less guidance available to direct the training of novices and beginners to achieve technical mastery.
Many online sources can identify what incorrect movements are taking place but often can’t identify the source of the problem, nor how to incorporate remedial exercises into the training.
THE ISSUE WITH ONLINE INSTRUCTION
There is some sound information for technique improvement available online. Many of the individuals posting online are quite familiar with bits and pieces of exercises and techniques that will improve technique, but because they are not integrated into an accessible whole, many athletes and coaches are not fully aware of all of the events that occur during an ex*****on of a sn**ch or clean & jerk.
THE PROGRAMMING ISSUE
There is precious little information generally available to keep the progress maintained over a period of 5 or more years. For athletes desirous of competing at the elite level, their initial annual volume might be about 7,000 reps of 60% or higher weights. When they achieve the elite category, the annual volume should be in the 20,000 to 25,000 range. Not many of today’s coaches or online authorities have the experience and expertise to write programming that will cover that range.
I have programmed athletes over this range and have been doing so for decades. I am making that information available to everyone at no charge.
THE ANSWER
I’ve just opened my new website, Takano BarTech, that deals with these two issues of technique acquisition and long term programming. I’ve included 4 tiers of training unavailable anywhere else.
• The First 8 Weeks is a detailed training program for those who are brand new to the sport and want to learn optimal technique. Each day’s training includes exercises and set and rep schemes as well as videos of each exercise. Each week features 3 days of barbell training and 2 days of general physical preparation to improve athletic skills. A person of average athletic ability can achieve technical proficiency in 8 weeks.
• Beginner Training provides weekly training programs on a drip basis. It is for the athlete who has technical proficiency and wants to improve training capacity to continue progressing. After a period in this program, the athlete should consider entering competition.
• Intermediate Training provides weekly drip training programs for athletes competing at the local level and are seeking to compete at the national level. The training volumes are higher and the weights employed are based on percentages of maximum for sn**ches, clean & jerk, back squats and front squats.
• Advanced Training is for the athlete who on the medal stand at national events and is seeking to achieve international team status. The weekly training programs provided on a drip basis are progressively demanding over a multi-year period. Percentages are employed, and the emphasis is on technical mastery of the classic movements as well as a rigorous loading of the organism.
THE BONUSES
Take advantage of the following bonuses during the 14 day Free Trial!
• A video glossary of all relevant exercises
• The Secret Bulgarian Training video documenting a training session of the 1987 Bulgarian National team at their peak. A number of world records are exceeded during this session.
• The Takano Weightlifting Seminar video covers detailed analysis of the technique of the sn**ch and clean & jerk among many other topics.
• Coaching the Sn**ch Video
• Winning Meet Coaching Video is ideal for coaches just getting started coaching in meets.
• Coaching the Jerk video
• The Coaching Eye video outlines the process for improving visual acuity of coaches.
• Program Planning video to help lifters and coaches in planning programming.
THE OFFER
All of these items are available for a free 14 day trial. This is a treasure chest of road tested training information that you’re able to peruse for 14 days. If you decide to continue the fee is just $57.00 per month, and you can cancel at any time. There is no long term commitment.
Check out this offer at
THE TWO BIG OBSTACLES FOR BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE LIFTERS/COACHES

I’m all too frequently confronted with the realities faced by beginning and intermediate lifters as they try to navigate the pathway to a rewarding weightlifting career. When coaching new athletes or teaching USAW courses most of the questions and queries deal with the development of proficient technique and how to program training to keep progress going.
This is to be expected and it’s not surprising that the answers are not readily available. Newer or less experienced coaches also have to be deal with these stumbling blocks, so I’ve tried to provide some guidance and information for lifters and coaches seeking answers.
THE OVERVIEW OF THE PATHWAY
There is an optimal path for the development of weightlifting proficiency. The initial or beginning phase should be largely dedicated to mastering technique while developing strength and speed characteristics of the body. Once technique is developed to a certain proficiency and the body can accommodate the rigors of regular training, the secondary phase can commence. This secondary phase emphasizes the refinement of technique mastery, while increasing strength, speed and the ability to train more rigorously.
THE STUMBLING BLOCKS OF TECHNIQUE TRAINING
There are some sources of technique training available such as the USAW L1 course or some books and many snippets of information available online. Unfortunately many novice lifters do not have access to a full, comprehensive knowledge of the many events that take place during the ex*****on of the sn**ch and clean & jerk. This is why there are so many queries online about relatively basic events during the performance of the lifts. Secondarily there is even less guidance available to direct the training of novices and beginners to achieve technical mastery.
Many online sources can identify what incorrect movements are taking place but often can’t identify the source of the problem, nor how to incorporate remedial exercises into the training.
THE ISSUE WITH ONLINE INSTRUCTION
There is some sound information for technique improvement available online. Many of the individuals posting online are quite familiar with bits and pieces of exercises and techniques that will improve technique, but because they are not integrated into an accessible whole, many athletes and coaches are not fully aware of all of the events that occur during an ex*****on of a sn**ch or clean & jerk.
THE PROGRAMMING ISSUE
There is precious little information generally available to keep the progress maintained over a period of 5 or more years. For athletes desirous of competing at the elite level, their initial annual volume might be about 7,000 reps of 60% or higher weights. When they achieve the elite category, the annual volume should be in the 20,000 to 25,000 range. Not many of today’s coaches or online authorities have the experience and expertise to write programming that will cover that range.
I have programmed athletes over this range and have been doing so for decades. I am making that information available to everyone at no charge.
THE ANSWER
I’ve just opened my new website, Takano BarTech, that deals with these two issues of technique acquisition and long term programming. I’ve included 4 tiers of training unavailable anywhere else.
• The First 8 Weeks is a detailed training program for those who are brand new to the sport and want to learn optimal technique. Each day’s training includes exercises and set and rep schemes as well as videos of each exercise. Each week features 3 days of barbell training and 2 days of general physical preparation to improve athletic skills. A person of average athletic ability can achieve technical proficiency in 8 weeks.
• Beginner Training provides weekly training programs on a drip basis. It is for the athlete who has technical proficiency and wants to improve training capacity to continue progressing. After a period in this program, the athlete should consider entering competition.
• Intermediate Training provides weekly drip training programs for athletes competing at the local level and are seeking to compete at the national level. The training volumes are higher and the weights employed are based on percentages of maximum for sn**ches, clean & jerk, back squats and front squats.
• Advanced Training is for the athlete who on the medal stand at national events and is seeking to achieve international team status. The weekly training programs provided on a drip basis are progressively demanding over a multi-year period. Percentages are employed, and the emphasis is on technical mastery of the classic movements as well as a rigorous loading of the organism.
THE BONUSES
Take advantage of the following bonuses during the 14 day Free Trial!
• A video glossary of all relevant exercises
• The Secret Bulgarian Training video documenting a training session of the 1987 Bulgarian National team at their peak. A number of world records are exceeded during this session.
• The Takano Weightlifting Seminar video covers detailed analysis of the technique of the sn**ch and clean & jerk among many other topics.
• Coaching the Sn**ch Video
• Winning Meet Coaching Video is ideal for coaches just getting started coaching in meets.
• Coaching the Jerk video
• The Coaching Eye video outlines the process for improving visual acuity of coaches.
• Program Planning video to help lifters and coaches in planning programming.
THE OFFER
All of these items are available for a free 14 day trial. This is a treasure chest of road tested training information that you’re able to peruse for 14 days. If you decide to continue the fee is just $57.00 per month, and you can cancel at any time. There is no long term commitment.
Check out this offer at
THE TWO BIG OBSTACLES FOR BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE LIFTERS/COACHES

I’m all too frequently confronted with the realities faced by beginning and intermediate lifters as they try to navigate the pathway to a rewarding weightlifting career. When coaching new athletes or teaching USAW courses most of the questions and queries deal with the development of proficient technique and how to program training to keep progress going.
This is to be expected and it’s not surprising that the answers are not readily available. Newer or less experienced coaches also have to be deal with these stumbling blocks, so I’ve tried to provide some guidance and information for lifters and coaches seeking answers.
THE OVERVIEW OF THE PATHWAY
There is an optimal path for the development of weightlifting proficiency. The initial or beginning phase should be largely dedicated to mastering technique while developing strength and speed characteristics of the body. Once technique is developed to a certain proficiency and the body can accommodate the rigors of regular training, the secondary phase can commence. This secondary phase emphasizes the refinement of technique mastery, while increasing strength, speed and the ability to train more rigorously.
THE STUMBLING BLOCKS OF TECHNIQUE TRAINING
There are some sources of technique training available such as the USAW L1 course or some books and many snippets of information available online. Unfortunately many novice lifters do not have access to a full, comprehensive knowledge of the many events that take place during the ex*****on of the sn**ch and clean & jerk. This is why there are so many queries online about relatively basic events during the performance of the lifts. Secondarily there is even less guidance available to direct the training of novices and beginners to achieve technical mastery.
Many online sources can identify what incorrect movements are taking place but often can’t identify the source of the problem, nor how to incorporate remedial exercises into the training.
THE ISSUE WITH ONLINE INSTRUCTION
There is some sound information for technique improvement available online. Many of the individuals posting online are quite familiar with bits and pieces of exercises and techniques that will improve technique, but because they are not integrated into an accessible whole, many athletes and coaches are not fully aware of all of the events that occur during an ex*****on of a sn**ch or clean & jerk.
THE PROGRAMMING ISSUE
There is precious little information generally available to keep the progress maintained over a period of 5 or more years. For athletes desirous of competing at the elite level, their initial annual volume might be about 7,000 reps of 60% or higher weights. When they achieve the elite category, the annual volume should be in the 20,000 to 25,000 range. Not many of today’s coaches or online authorities have the experience and expertise to write programming that will cover that range.
I have programmed athletes over this range and have been doing so for decades. I am making that information available to everyone at no charge.
THE ANSWER
I’ve just opened my new website, Takano BarTech, that deals with these two issues of technique acquisition and long term programming. I’ve included 4 tiers of training unavailable anywhere else.
• The First 8 Weeks is a detailed training program for those who are brand new to the sport and want to learn optimal technique. Each day’s training includes exercises and set and rep schemes as well as videos of each exercise. Each week features 3 days of barbell training and 2 days of general physical preparation to improve athletic skills. A person of average athletic ability can achieve technical proficiency in 8 weeks.
• Beginner Training provides weekly training programs on a drip basis. It is for the athlete who has technical proficiency and wants to improve training capacity to continue progressing. After a period in this program, the athlete should consider entering competition.
• Intermediate Training provides weekly drip training programs for athletes competing at the local level and are seeking to compete at the national level. The training volumes are higher and the weights employed are based on percentages of maximum for sn**ches, clean & jerk, back squats and front squats.
• Advanced Training is for the athlete who on the medal stand at national events and is seeking to achieve international team status. The weekly training programs provided on a drip basis are progressively demanding over a multi-year period. Percentages are employed, and the emphasis is on technical mastery of the classic movements as well as a rigorous loading of the organism.
THE BONUSES
Take advantage of the following bonuses during the 14 day Free Trial!
• A video glossary of all relevant exercises
• The Secret Bulgarian Training video documenting a training session of the 1987 Bulgarian National team at their peak. A number of world records are exceeded during this session.
• The Takano Weightlifting Seminar video covers detailed analysis of the technique of the sn**ch and clean & jerk among many other topics.
• Coaching the Sn**ch Video
• Winning Meet Coaching Video is ideal for coaches just getting started coaching in meets.
• Coaching the Jerk video
• The Coaching Eye video outlines the process for improving visual acuity of coaches.
• Program Planning video to help lifters and coaches in planning programming.
THE OFFER
All of these items are available for a free 14 day trial. This is a treasure chest of road tested training information that you’re able to peruse for 14 days. If you decide to continue the fee is just $57.00 per month, and you can cancel at any time. There is no long term commitment.
Check out this offer at
THE TWO BIG OBSTACLES FOR BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE LIFTERS/COACHES

I’m all too frequently confronted with the realities faced by beginning and intermediate lifters as they try to navigate the pathway to a rewarding weightlifting career. When coaching new athletes or teaching USAW courses most of the questions and queries deal with the development of proficient technique and how to program training to keep progress going.
This is to be expected and it’s not surprising that the answers are not readily available. Newer or less experienced coaches also have to be deal with these stumbling blocks, so I’ve tried to provide some guidance and information for lifters and coaches seeking answers.
THE OVERVIEW OF THE PATHWAY
There is an optimal path for the development of weightlifting proficiency. The initial or beginning phase should be largely dedicated to mastering technique while developing strength and speed characteristics of the body. Once technique is developed to a certain proficiency and the body can accommodate the rigors of regular training, the secondary phase can commence. This secondary phase emphasizes the refinement of technique mastery, while increasing strength, speed and the ability to train more rigorously.
THE STUMBLING BLOCKS OF TECHNIQUE TRAINING
There are some sources of technique training available such as the USAW L1 course or some books and many snippets of information available online. Unfortunately many novice lifters do not have access to a full, comprehensive knowledge of the many events that take place during the ex*****on of the sn**ch and clean & jerk. This is why there are so many queries online about relatively basic events during the performance of the lifts. Secondarily there is even less guidance available to direct the training of novices and beginners to achieve technical mastery.
Many online sources can identify what incorrect movements are taking place but often can’t identify the source of the problem, nor how to incorporate remedial exercises into the training.
THE ISSUE WITH ONLINE INSTRUCTION
There is some sound information for technique improvement available online. Many of the individuals posting online are quite familiar with bits and pieces of exercises and techniques that will improve technique, but because they are not integrated into an accessible whole, many athletes and coaches are not fully aware of all of the events that occur during an ex*****on of a sn**ch or clean & jerk.
THE PROGRAMMING ISSUE
There is precious little information generally available to keep the progress maintained over a period of 5 or more years. For athletes desirous of competing at the elite level, their initial annual volume might be about 7,000 reps of 60% or higher weights. When they achieve the elite category, the annual volume should be in the 20,000 to 25,000 range. Not many of today’s coaches or online authorities have the experience and expertise to write programming that will cover that range.
I have programmed athletes over this range and have been doing so for decades. I am making that information available to everyone at no charge.
THE ANSWER
I’ve just opened my new website, Takano BarTech, that deals with these two issues of technique acquisition and long term programming. I’ve included 4 tiers of training unavailable anywhere else.
• The First 8 Weeks is a detailed training program for those who are brand new to the sport and want to learn optimal technique. Each day’s training includes exercises and set and rep schemes as well as videos of each exercise. Each week features 3 days of barbell training and 2 days of general physical preparation to improve athletic skills. A person of average athletic ability can achieve technical proficiency in 8 weeks.
• Beginner Training provides weekly training programs on a drip basis. It is for the athlete who has technical proficiency and wants to improve training capacity to continue progressing. After a period in this program, the athlete should consider entering competition.
• Intermediate Training provides weekly drip training programs for athletes competing at the local level and are seeking to compete at the national level. The training volumes are higher and the weights employed are based on percentages of maximum for sn**ches, clean & jerk, back squats and front squats.
• Advanced Training is for the athlete who on the medal stand at national events and is seeking to achieve international team status. The weekly training programs provided on a drip basis are progressively demanding over a multi-year period. Percentages are employed, and the emphasis is on technical mastery of the classic movements as well as a rigorous loading of the organism.
THE BONUSES
Take advantage of the following bonuses during the 14 day Free Trial!
• A video glossary of all relevant exercises
• The Secret Bulgarian Training video documenting a training session of the 1987 Bulgarian National team at their peak. A number of world records are exceeded during this session.
• The Takano Weightlifting Seminar video covers detailed analysis of the technique of the sn**ch and clean & jerk among many other topics.
• Coaching the Sn**ch Video
• Winning Meet Coaching Video is ideal for coaches just getting started coaching in meets.
• Coaching the Jerk video
• The Coaching Eye video outlines the process for improving visual acuity of coaches.
• Program Planning video to help lifters and coaches in planning programming.
THE OFFER
All of these items are available for a free 14 day trial. This is a treasure chest of road tested training information that you’re able to peruse for 14 days. If you decide to continue the fee is just $57.00 per month, and you can cancel at any time. There is no long term commitment.
Check out this offer at

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Videos (show all)

PR Snatch for @ginagrace17 ! Way to go Gina! #takanoweightlifting #usaw #southernpacificlwc #snatch #weightlifting #wome...
Don't let bodyweight classes interfere with your young lifters' development!
@takanoweightlifting is back open indoors!!!! As the county has moved into a less restrictive tier we are now allowed ba...
@xtine_na building back better after knee surgery! Looking good! 💪🏽🏋🏾‍♀️#womenwholift #takanoweightlifting #southernpaci...
PR C+Jk for @herrickane ! Herrick’s been chasing 130kg for a while, way to go Herrick! #takanoweightlifting #usaw #clean...
Big PR Snatch for remote competition team lifter @stephmartinez_lifts ! Well done Stephanie more kilos to come!!! #takan...
The First 8 Days Sample
Short clip from Athlete Rep @sarahd_gb about the state of @iwfnet  corruption and the continued effort of corrupt board ...
Deborah Robinson jerks 51 kg for her 7th national record.
Deborah Robinson's 40 kg national record snatch!

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