Fit to the Core

Fit to the Core Total Body Wellness offers online coaching for women 50+ who are ready for a transformation. You can join our FREE Facebook Community, Younger Tomorrow, at https://bit.ly/2XkXEDp.

Fit to the Core helps women 55+ to feel strong and sexy again so that they no longer feel self-conscious, unattractive or uncomfortable in their own skin , but instead feel strong, confident and 5-10 years younger by their next birthday, experience a full-life transformation. We stand together against a society who mistakenly believes that being over 55 is being old, declining and unsexy. We know

Operating as usual

10/29/2021

Fear can be a powerful motivator.

Forget about the entertaining scares from ghosts, aliens and the supernatural.

Think about how fear – blind TERROR – can cause us to take action. It’s the classic “fight or flight” response that’s hard-wired into human behavior, right?

For Rocky Eilerston (on the left), it was simple, powerful and effective fear that drove him to get healthy.

“No needles,” Rocky recalls, a shudder in his voice.

Rocky had gained too much weight when his doctor told him he was heading for daily use of needles for diabetes. Rocky was 270 pounds at 5’10”. He was so unnerved that he walked across the street – literally – and into a gym, where he hired a trainer to help him.

“It’s the first time I ever set foot in a gym,” says Rocky, who grinds stumps to pulp for a living at age 63. “In my entire life.”

Rocky started working out and dropped down to 200 pounds, with his waist size going from 40 to 34 inches. His doctor took Rocky off his diabetes medicine, and lowered his blood-pressure dosage, too.

Exercise to Manage Health Conditions

Getting fit after 50 is a great way to reduce the amount of prescription medication we need. It also helps prevent the development of complicating conditions like Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. Exercise helps with arthritis pain, and a proper diet can lower inflammation. Both help you sleep better and manage your physical and mental health.

Studies suggest that taking too many daily prescriptions can lead to health complications, and some combinations can produce unwanted effects like falls, dehydration, and cloudy thinking. Plus, some of us just don’t like the idea of taking one more pill every day.

If you think you’re on too many prescriptions, you might want to talk to your doctor about making lifestyle choices that could reduce your need for so many. And if you see more than one doctor regularly, make sure they all know about all your medications.

You and your physician might be able to come up with a plan that involves regular exercise, good eating habits, and follow-up visits to see how you’re adjusting.

We all age differently, and many of us need medicine as we age. But, as Rocky proves, we can often do something about it.

Fear can be a powerful motivator.

Forget about the entertaining scares from ghosts, aliens and the supernatural.

Think about how fear – blind TERROR – can cause us to take action. It’s the classic “fight or flight” response that’s hard-wired into human behavior, right?

For Rocky Eilerston (on the left), it was simple, powerful and effective fear that drove him to get healthy.

“No needles,” Rocky recalls, a shudder in his voice.

Rocky had gained too much weight when his doctor told him he was heading for daily use of needles for diabetes. Rocky was 270 pounds at 5’10”. He was so unnerved that he walked across the street – literally – and into a gym, where he hired a trainer to help him.

“It’s the first time I ever set foot in a gym,” says Rocky, who grinds stumps to pulp for a living at age 63. “In my entire life.”

Rocky started working out and dropped down to 200 pounds, with his waist size going from 40 to 34 inches. His doctor took Rocky off his diabetes medicine, and lowered his blood-pressure dosage, too.

Exercise to Manage Health Conditions

Getting fit after 50 is a great way to reduce the amount of prescription medication we need. It also helps prevent the development of complicating conditions like Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. Exercise helps with arthritis pain, and a proper diet can lower inflammation. Both help you sleep better and manage your physical and mental health.

Studies suggest that taking too many daily prescriptions can lead to health complications, and some combinations can produce unwanted effects like falls, dehydration, and cloudy thinking. Plus, some of us just don’t like the idea of taking one more pill every day.

If you think you’re on too many prescriptions, you might want to talk to your doctor about making lifestyle choices that could reduce your need for so many. And if you see more than one doctor regularly, make sure they all know about all your medications.

You and your physician might be able to come up with a plan that involves regular exercise, good eating habits, and follow-up visits to see how you’re adjusting.

We all age differently, and many of us need medicine as we age. But, as Rocky proves, we can often do something about it.

10/27/2021

A Comic's Truth

A Comic's Truth

10/26/2021

5 Fast Facts about Lowering High Blood Pressure

Everyone knows high blood pressure is a killer. It’s the No. 1 cause of heart attacks in the United States, and the most important risk factor for strokes.

And we know it’s a bigger problem later in life, afflicting up to 65 percent of people 60 and over.

But do you know the best ways to help keep your blood pressure right where you and your doctor want it?

Here are the top five.

1. Exercise regularly. Studies prove that strength training and aerobics workouts lower both numbers of your blood pressure – the systolic and diastolic. This is one more reason you need to be lifting weights, using resistance bands, or practicing yoga. Strength training equals life. It does not equal bodybuilding! And, of course, exercise is a great way to…

2. Maintain a healthy weight. More than a quarter of people with high blood pressure are obese. Being overweight makes your heart work harder to pump blood through your body.

3. Manage stress. Take time every day to purposefully calm down, sit still, and focus on your breathing. Get enough sleep. Enjoy the outdoors, the arts, and hobbies.

4. Drink alcohol moderately if at all, and don’t smoke. The first part means no more than two drinks a day for me, and one for women. The second part means, Come on – are you kidding?

5. Watch salt? Yes. But also sugar. Limit how much of both you put on foods. But remember that both salt and sugar are added heavily into our processed foods, so start reading labels and making your grocery choices accordingly.

Talk to your doctor about hypertension (another word for high blood pressure). We’re here to show you how exercise helps.

5 Fast Facts about Lowering High Blood Pressure

Everyone knows high blood pressure is a killer. It’s the No. 1 cause of heart attacks in the United States, and the most important risk factor for strokes.

And we know it’s a bigger problem later in life, afflicting up to 65 percent of people 60 and over.

But do you know the best ways to help keep your blood pressure right where you and your doctor want it?

Here are the top five.

1. Exercise regularly. Studies prove that strength training and aerobics workouts lower both numbers of your blood pressure – the systolic and diastolic. This is one more reason you need to be lifting weights, using resistance bands, or practicing yoga. Strength training equals life. It does not equal bodybuilding! And, of course, exercise is a great way to…

2. Maintain a healthy weight. More than a quarter of people with high blood pressure are obese. Being overweight makes your heart work harder to pump blood through your body.

3. Manage stress. Take time every day to purposefully calm down, sit still, and focus on your breathing. Get enough sleep. Enjoy the outdoors, the arts, and hobbies.

4. Drink alcohol moderately if at all, and don’t smoke. The first part means no more than two drinks a day for me, and one for women. The second part means, Come on – are you kidding?

5. Watch salt? Yes. But also sugar. Limit how much of both you put on foods. But remember that both salt and sugar are added heavily into our processed foods, so start reading labels and making your grocery choices accordingly.

Talk to your doctor about hypertension (another word for high blood pressure). We’re here to show you how exercise helps.

10/22/2021

What Muscle Means to You after 50

What does it mean to have muscle?

When we were kids, we probably thought of athletes and superheroes.

In our 20s, we might have associated muscle with lots of weightlifting in the gym and young men with bulging physiques.

But later in life, we need to realize that muscle means more than big biceps.

We need muscle to perform all kinds of tasks – even standing up off the couch requires muscle. It’s that basic to our everyday lives and function.

Muscle means life – ordinary, simple life for everyone. And we start losing it in our 30s, which can lead to all kinds of trouble if we don’t do something about it. And that “something” is resistance training – also known as weightlifting or strength training.

Have You Heard of Sarcopenia?

There’s even a medical term for this losing muscle mass: sarcopenia. The condition is commonly associated with aging, but it is not inevitable. You can prevent it and even reverse it at the gym or fitness studio.

You know the stereotypes about being old and frail.

And you might have noticed that you struggle more to, say, bring in the groceries lately.

Trust us, this is common but preventable and treatable with regular resistance exercise and proper nutrition.

“Sarcopenia can be considered for muscle what osteoporosis is to bone,” said Dr. John E. Morley, St. Louis University School of Medicine, in the journal Family Practice.

Dr. Jeremy Walston said in the National Institutes of Health, “Sarcopenia is one of the most important causes of functional decline and loss of independence in older adults.”

If you’re entering midlife or if you’re already more advanced, talk to your doctor about sarcopenia. He should tell you about resistance training to prevent issues linked to sarcopenia including weakness, increased risk of falling, increased likelihood of fractures, insulin resistance and obesity.

Being inactive contributes to sarcopenia – which then contributes to inactivity.

Break the Cycle

We’ve all heard the old adage, “Use it or lose it,” right? It’s true when it comes to muscle and aging bodies. If you don’t use your muscle, you will lose it. If you use it, you’ll keep it – and all the functional ability and strength that includes.

Doctors have known for decades that exercise can reverse muscle losses of sarcopenia. But it still hasn’t filtered down into our general awareness, where “muscle” still means Arnold Schwarzenegger.
By using resistance bands, body weight, machines, or free weights, we increase muscle strength, size, and endurance.
That means you move better, feel better, look better, and sleep better. For starters.

IT DOES NOT MEAN you will get huge. Period. Full stop.

Call us today so we can talk about strength and muscle, answer your questions, and get you going with a safe, fun, and effective program.
It doesn’t take much to start seeing important results.

What Muscle Means to You after 50

What does it mean to have muscle?

When we were kids, we probably thought of athletes and superheroes.

In our 20s, we might have associated muscle with lots of weightlifting in the gym and young men with bulging physiques.

But later in life, we need to realize that muscle means more than big biceps.

We need muscle to perform all kinds of tasks – even standing up off the couch requires muscle. It’s that basic to our everyday lives and function.

Muscle means life – ordinary, simple life for everyone. And we start losing it in our 30s, which can lead to all kinds of trouble if we don’t do something about it. And that “something” is resistance training – also known as weightlifting or strength training.

Have You Heard of Sarcopenia?

There’s even a medical term for this losing muscle mass: sarcopenia. The condition is commonly associated with aging, but it is not inevitable. You can prevent it and even reverse it at the gym or fitness studio.

You know the stereotypes about being old and frail.

And you might have noticed that you struggle more to, say, bring in the groceries lately.

Trust us, this is common but preventable and treatable with regular resistance exercise and proper nutrition.

“Sarcopenia can be considered for muscle what osteoporosis is to bone,” said Dr. John E. Morley, St. Louis University School of Medicine, in the journal Family Practice.

Dr. Jeremy Walston said in the National Institutes of Health, “Sarcopenia is one of the most important causes of functional decline and loss of independence in older adults.”

If you’re entering midlife or if you’re already more advanced, talk to your doctor about sarcopenia. He should tell you about resistance training to prevent issues linked to sarcopenia including weakness, increased risk of falling, increased likelihood of fractures, insulin resistance and obesity.

Being inactive contributes to sarcopenia – which then contributes to inactivity.

Break the Cycle

We’ve all heard the old adage, “Use it or lose it,” right? It’s true when it comes to muscle and aging bodies. If you don’t use your muscle, you will lose it. If you use it, you’ll keep it – and all the functional ability and strength that includes.

Doctors have known for decades that exercise can reverse muscle losses of sarcopenia. But it still hasn’t filtered down into our general awareness, where “muscle” still means Arnold Schwarzenegger.
By using resistance bands, body weight, machines, or free weights, we increase muscle strength, size, and endurance.
That means you move better, feel better, look better, and sleep better. For starters.

IT DOES NOT MEAN you will get huge. Period. Full stop.

Call us today so we can talk about strength and muscle, answer your questions, and get you going with a safe, fun, and effective program.
It doesn’t take much to start seeing important results.

10/21/2021

One Step At A Time

One Step At A Time

10/20/2021

The Core Is More Than Your Abs

You’ve heard how important it is to keep your core strong. But if you think that means tons of time on your back performing sit-ups and crunches, think again.

The core involves so much more than your abs – and a more engaging set of exercises to keep it shipshape.

It’s your entire midsection, including your hips and glutes (butt). It is the foundation of your body, the area that directs all your movements – forward, back, side to side… arms, legs. Your hips, abs and glutes all work together and provide support for your back. So, if the core is weak, it can lead to compensation, pain and injury.

You want to train your core so it can send necessary force to your limbs. And sit-ups and crunches aren’t the best way to do that. (Which is great, because they’re also boring and can strain your neck and back.)

Contact us and we can talk about simple exercises that are more transferrable to everyday activities and sports.

Your abdominals absorb force and produce force, most times in a rotational pattern, so it’s good to train them that way. For instance, a chop will strengthen that rotational pattern, making it easier for you to do just about anything, like household chores and your tennis swing. The hips require more mobility, generating movement in multiple planes of motion.

So, when you think about core training, scrap the notion that it’s just about the abs and feeling the burn. Your core is a team of muscles, and we can show you how to work them together for better ease, power and protection from injury -- and more fun than endless sit-ups!

The Core Is More Than Your Abs

You’ve heard how important it is to keep your core strong. But if you think that means tons of time on your back performing sit-ups and crunches, think again.

The core involves so much more than your abs – and a more engaging set of exercises to keep it shipshape.

It’s your entire midsection, including your hips and glutes (butt). It is the foundation of your body, the area that directs all your movements – forward, back, side to side… arms, legs. Your hips, abs and glutes all work together and provide support for your back. So, if the core is weak, it can lead to compensation, pain and injury.

You want to train your core so it can send necessary force to your limbs. And sit-ups and crunches aren’t the best way to do that. (Which is great, because they’re also boring and can strain your neck and back.)

Contact us and we can talk about simple exercises that are more transferrable to everyday activities and sports.

Your abdominals absorb force and produce force, most times in a rotational pattern, so it’s good to train them that way. For instance, a chop will strengthen that rotational pattern, making it easier for you to do just about anything, like household chores and your tennis swing. The hips require more mobility, generating movement in multiple planes of motion.

So, when you think about core training, scrap the notion that it’s just about the abs and feeling the burn. Your core is a team of muscles, and we can show you how to work them together for better ease, power and protection from injury -- and more fun than endless sit-ups!

10/16/2021

Exercise against Obesity: Success at the Gym

Mary Frances Benton, 59, knows it will take some time to lose 40 pounds. But she’s already down 15 since February, so her spirit is strong.

She’s also done this before.

About 10 years ago, Mary Frances noticed that she was gaining weight. There wasn’t a main reason she could cite, so she went to a friend’s gym and asked for a trainer.

Within a month, she was feeling better – stronger, and with more endurance.

But an out-of-nowhere stroke seven years ago took its toll. So has the pandemic – Mary Frances didn’t make it to her gym during lockdown. But now, since returning in February to work with the same trainer she knows and loves, Mary Frances is slimming down and feeling great.

“I have a Peloton at home, but I prefer coming to the gym,” she says. “I know he’s going to push me, and I need that.”

42% Gained Unwanted Weight During Covid

She’s not alone.

The American Psychological Association reports that 42% of adults gained unwanted weight during the pandemic. Lockdowns made it harder to eat right and exercise against obesity, and many of us were stressed out, which contributes to weight gain and a bunch of other health issues.

For Gen Xers (ages 43-56), the average weight gain was 21 pounds.
For Boomers (57-75) it was 16 pounds.
And for people 76 and over, fully one-fourth reported undesired weight gain.
More Americans than ever are obese – 42.4 percent, according to research. Obesity and age are two of the main factors contributing to deaths of people who become infected with the coronavirus.

Conventional wisdom has told us that our metabolisms slow down as we age. But new research in Science suggests that simply isn’t true. To feel more energetic, we can stop focusing on age and focus instead on lifestyle choices we can control – like exercise, eating right, managing stress, and getting enough sleep.

Resistance Training Is Key

Ditch the diet sodas for water. Get plenty of sleep every night. And move your body purposefully throughout the day, not just at the gym.

Also important: resistance training. Or you can call it strength training or even (gasp) weightlifting! Whatever term you prefer, it’s essential to health and maintaining a proper weight after 50.

And, no, women don’t need to worry about getting bulky.

Just ask Mary Frances, whose passion for exercise against obesity includes weightlifting more than running (and she’s run two half-marathons).

“Unless you take steroids, it’s just not going to happen,” she says. “When I first started working out, I was going thru perimenopause. The weightlifting really helped with mood swings. I prefer it to cardio.”

She’s looking forward to an adults-only trip to Disney World with her husband and two grown sons. And the exercise is all a part of her plan to live well, which includes losing the weight.

“I’m going to keep doing this and keep eating right,” she says.

Say hi to Mickey for us, Mary Frances. And keep up the excellent work. You’re inspiring other mature adults to seek help with living a better lifestyle.

We’re here to help YOU, too. If you are ready to experience a transformation comment below and we will reach out to you or give us a call.

Exercise against Obesity: Success at the Gym

Mary Frances Benton, 59, knows it will take some time to lose 40 pounds. But she’s already down 15 since February, so her spirit is strong.

She’s also done this before.

About 10 years ago, Mary Frances noticed that she was gaining weight. There wasn’t a main reason she could cite, so she went to a friend’s gym and asked for a trainer.

Within a month, she was feeling better – stronger, and with more endurance.

But an out-of-nowhere stroke seven years ago took its toll. So has the pandemic – Mary Frances didn’t make it to her gym during lockdown. But now, since returning in February to work with the same trainer she knows and loves, Mary Frances is slimming down and feeling great.

“I have a Peloton at home, but I prefer coming to the gym,” she says. “I know he’s going to push me, and I need that.”

42% Gained Unwanted Weight During Covid

She’s not alone.

The American Psychological Association reports that 42% of adults gained unwanted weight during the pandemic. Lockdowns made it harder to eat right and exercise against obesity, and many of us were stressed out, which contributes to weight gain and a bunch of other health issues.

For Gen Xers (ages 43-56), the average weight gain was 21 pounds.
For Boomers (57-75) it was 16 pounds.
And for people 76 and over, fully one-fourth reported undesired weight gain.
More Americans than ever are obese – 42.4 percent, according to research. Obesity and age are two of the main factors contributing to deaths of people who become infected with the coronavirus.

Conventional wisdom has told us that our metabolisms slow down as we age. But new research in Science suggests that simply isn’t true. To feel more energetic, we can stop focusing on age and focus instead on lifestyle choices we can control – like exercise, eating right, managing stress, and getting enough sleep.

Resistance Training Is Key

Ditch the diet sodas for water. Get plenty of sleep every night. And move your body purposefully throughout the day, not just at the gym.

Also important: resistance training. Or you can call it strength training or even (gasp) weightlifting! Whatever term you prefer, it’s essential to health and maintaining a proper weight after 50.

And, no, women don’t need to worry about getting bulky.

Just ask Mary Frances, whose passion for exercise against obesity includes weightlifting more than running (and she’s run two half-marathons).

“Unless you take steroids, it’s just not going to happen,” she says. “When I first started working out, I was going thru perimenopause. The weightlifting really helped with mood swings. I prefer it to cardio.”

She’s looking forward to an adults-only trip to Disney World with her husband and two grown sons. And the exercise is all a part of her plan to live well, which includes losing the weight.

“I’m going to keep doing this and keep eating right,” she says.

Say hi to Mickey for us, Mary Frances. And keep up the excellent work. You’re inspiring other mature adults to seek help with living a better lifestyle.

We’re here to help YOU, too. If you are ready to experience a transformation comment below and we will reach out to you or give us a call.

Our Story

Fit to the Core specializes in functional aging and behavior change in women over forty (Baby Boomers!) and the older adult population. We help people to move better, look better and feel better. We provide lifestyle coaching and one-on-one or small group personal training in the client's home or at Fit to the Core's private studio in North Phoenix, Arizona in addition to online personal training and consulting.

Let us help you discover a love for fitness that will help you to be the best version of yourself so that you can do all the things that you need to do & want to do for the rest of your life.

“True enjoyment comes from activity of the mind and exercise of the body; the two are united.” - Alexander von Humboldt

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N 7th St & E Greenway Parkway Rd
Phoenix, AZ
85022
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