Bramblewood Stables

Bramblewood Stables

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Bramblewood Stables - thank you for offering such a wonderful program!
1-hour introductory riding lesson at Bramblewood Stables in Taylors:

https://e.givesmart.com/events/dZN/i/_All/bfY4/?search=
Hi my name is Mistie Townsend. I'm a Farm and Equine Insurance Specialist living and working for the last 25 years in "The Horse Capital of the World", Ocala, FL. I write Farm, Auto, Excess, and Equine Mortality policies all across the Southeast United States. Call or email today for a competitive quote for all your insurance needs. Licensed in many States!
This has been a fantastic place for my daughters to learn how to ride horses. Kim is wonderful and it is a very positive, safe environment to learn about horses. Highly recommend!
What to do with an egg? Now that Bramblewood's chickens are laying.....

Hey Bramblewood, with no lessons for two weeks due to our vacation, Brooklyn and I are looking forward to seeing all your smiling faces tomorrow. 😃😃🐴🐴
I can't say enough about Kimberly Carter, her work ethic and passion for what she does. Kimberly will always have the student and horse's best interests at heart. Kimberly hosted the ARIA Certification Testing that we both attended and obtained our qualifications. ARIA has a very high expectation of knowledge regarding all aspects of running a horse facility. Professionalism and safety are key factors. Anyone visiting any horse riding establishment should be concerned if situations were not addressed that are considered dangerous to a student and their mount. Kimberly has that professionalism to ensure situations are dealt with. Be assured that Bramblewood Stables is a jewel in South Carolina for all your riding activities.
RIP Toby!

Visitors by appointment only. A unique urban farm offering riding lessons, life coaching and workshops. Learn more at bramblewoodstables.com With lessons offered for all ages and abilities every day throughout the week, Bramblewood is also a full boarding and training facility.

ARIA certified instructors and a magical environment are just minutes away from downtown Greenville, SC.

Operating as usual

01/08/2022

This post contains lots of dressage history — notably how dressage changed with the modernization of warfare and what that meant for the traditions we’re still using that came out of Ft. Riley, Kansas.

Authentic dressage became obsolete because it was solely a mounted military practice. The basic nature of war changed from human/equine cavalry and infantry foot soldiers to primarily mechanized troops.

This change ultimately resulted in dressage being redefined as ballet or art. Before this change, national military cavalry training manuals, most dressage based, were military secret documents.

Dressage(FR) translates roughly to the word, training and was used for war horses and soldiers.

Dressage began authentically as the European foundation of training that transformed mounted soldiers and their horses into battlefield weapons, both offensive and defensive.

The images you see below are of techniques meant to kick and otherwise intimidate, injure or kill enemy soldiers on a battlefield.

The lower right picture of the Courbette, for example, is an offensive technique meant to break a tight formation of infantry soldiers in a defensive square formation.

From the pictured "rearing" position, a line of horses would hop forward on hind legs, threatening foot soldiers with the horses' striking fore feet down on the heads of infantry. Foot soldiers ran in fear from such techniques as lines of enemy cavalry horses came closer.

The lower left picture is the Capriole. Its purpose was to defend an individual cavalry rider who was separated from his unit on the battlefield. Infantrymen would smarm such isolated cavalry horses and attack the horse and rider with bayonets, clubs and pikes. To counter such an infantry swarm, a highly trained cavalryman would do a Capriole.

The rider would cause his horse to rise up and kick out front and hind, which literally kicked the heads off the shoulders of swarming enemy foot soldiers. Cavalry horses could do a Capriole, land and turn 20 to 30 degrees and do another, then turn and do another, which created a wide berth from which the rider would escape the swarm and return to his unit.

The top picture is a collection of the haute ecole "Airs Above the Ground.”

If you examine each pictured movement and analyze it, you see that each movement makes a horse into a weapon.

The movement names are French because the French Cavalry units, like Napoleon's Imperial Guard, were the best trained in these battlefield movements.

The American Cavalry tradition follows the French Saumur Cavalry School methods with regard to dressage as a basis because the US Mounted Service School (later renamed the Cavalry School) at Fort Riley, founded in 1914, had no advanced training manuals.

Cavalry riding before then was decentralized into our regiments in the English tradition, using verbally handed down methods.

This made cavalry trooper transfers between regiments very difficult. With WW1 on the horizon, US Army Headquarters switched to a national Cavalry training standard.

We asked our ally France for their classified riding manuals, which they gladly delivered. Those French secret manuals were translated at Fort Riley by a Capt. Campbell.

The "Airs Above the Ground" were eventually dropped from Cavalry training because these techniques were for heavy cavalry in slower antiquated "set piece" battles. By 1916 mechanization caused the speed of warfare to increase. Cavalry became lighter and faster and the Airs were no match for the new repeating pistol or rifle fire.

The US Fort Riley Seat grew from three influences. First was from our English Colonial heritage, from which we incorporated British high speed military riding skills. Later, from our ally the French, we gained the precision of the Saumur French Cavalry School's refined dressage/training techniques. Lastly, what made our US Fort Riley Seat uniquely the best was the strong influence of western ranch riding that brought what I call the "go anywhere-do anything" skills to the Fort Riley Cavalry School training. It was this combination of influences that created the purely American, practically versatile Fort Riley Seat that Harry Chamberlin consolidated at the Fort Riley Cavalry School into the Horsemanship & Horsemastership manuals between WW1 and WW2. I wonder how many dressage riders know this historical basis for their discipline.

Bob Wood -Horses for Life

01/03/2022

I know you’re all super curious about all the stuff we do at Bramblewood Stables, so I present a first edition PDF of our Participant Handbook. You’ll find policies, philosophies, pricing, and a bunch of weird rules that only apply to places populated by 1000-pound, fear-driven quadrupeds.

You don’t have to be a Bramblewood client to request a copy. I’ll send our manual to you if you’re curious, thinking about starting a program, wanting to join our program, trying to figure out what all this stuff is I post about all the time, or another barn researching pricing (all you have to do is ask — I too sneak around seeing what other places are charging). We’re all in this together.

You should not request a copy of this manual if you:
1. Do not read directions. If you take too much pride in shoddily constructing an IKEA wardrobe without seeing which screw you should attach to which nut, we’re probably not the best farm for you. Horses require an ability to put your ego aside. I wrote this manual so that people will actually read it and remember to not open an umbrella beside a crowded arena.
2. Live by a philosophy of asking forgiveness rather than permission. If ignorance has been your go-to mechanism for not taking responsibility for your actions, this manual probably isn’t for you.
3. Are a parent with a child who has never taken a lesson, but you’re ready to buy them a horse.
4. Want to go to a horse show because of the cute outfits.
5. Are looking for a farm that goes to horse shows (we address this in the manual, so maybe you should request a copy).
6. Looking to stay away from weather, dirt, and the hard stuff that brings human growth.

If you don’t see yourself in the above exclusions, send me a DM or a note here in the comments and I will get a Participant Handbook to you pronto. If there is a topic you would like to see covered that is not included in the manual, let me know so I can write it up. The Participant Handbook is a living, breathing, expanding document.

I’ll see you at the farm (where you can even score a hard copy of the manual and if I’m feeling giddy, I’ll sign it).

I know you’re all super curious about all the stuff we do at Bramblewood Stables, so I present a first edition PDF of our Participant Handbook. You’ll find policies, philosophies, pricing, and a bunch of weird rules that only apply to places populated by 1000-pound, fear-driven quadrupeds.

You don’t have to be a Bramblewood client to request a copy. I’ll send our manual to you if you’re curious, thinking about starting a program, wanting to join our program, trying to figure out what all this stuff is I post about all the time, or another barn researching pricing (all you have to do is ask — I too sneak around seeing what other places are charging). We’re all in this together.

You should not request a copy of this manual if you:
1. Do not read directions. If you take too much pride in shoddily constructing an IKEA wardrobe without seeing which screw you should attach to which nut, we’re probably not the best farm for you. Horses require an ability to put your ego aside. I wrote this manual so that people will actually read it and remember to not open an umbrella beside a crowded arena.
2. Live by a philosophy of asking forgiveness rather than permission. If ignorance has been your go-to mechanism for not taking responsibility for your actions, this manual probably isn’t for you.
3. Are a parent with a child who has never taken a lesson, but you’re ready to buy them a horse.
4. Want to go to a horse show because of the cute outfits.
5. Are looking for a farm that goes to horse shows (we address this in the manual, so maybe you should request a copy).
6. Looking to stay away from weather, dirt, and the hard stuff that brings human growth.

If you don’t see yourself in the above exclusions, send me a DM or a note here in the comments and I will get a Participant Handbook to you pronto. If there is a topic you would like to see covered that is not included in the manual, let me know so I can write it up. The Participant Handbook is a living, breathing, expanding document.

I’ll see you at the farm (where you can even score a hard copy of the manual and if I’m feeling giddy, I’ll sign it).

01/02/2022

Two days in and Miss Tricia’s weekly art just about sums it up.

#bramblewoodstables #newyear #bunnies #sketchbook #yeahthatgreenville #horses #love

Two days in and Miss Tricia’s weekly art just about sums it up.

#bramblewoodstables #newyear #bunnies #sketchbook #yeahthatgreenville #horses #love

01/02/2022

In the spring of 1977, a rough-hewn bargain basement c**t named Seattle Slew became thoroughbred racing’s tenth Triple Crown winner. His trainer was a weed-thin, six-foot-two-inch former steeplechase rider named Billy Turner, who managed his juggernaut of a horse with such finesse that from his first start right through the Triple Crown, he was never beaten, a feat no horse, not even Secretariat, had accomplished.

Nearly half a century has passed. Slew left us long ago. Turner retired and moved to Florida. Last year, while mowing a pasture with a tractor, he struck a tree branch, sending it whipping around and cracking into his neck. He was gravely injured, with three broken vertebrae and terrible nerve damage. Doctors also discovered advanced prostate cancer, which had spread to his bones. Billy had to learn to walk and swallow again, and face a difficult prognosis with his cancer. His story was briefly in the racing news, then faded away.

Near the beginning of my career, I called Billy at his barn at Belmont Park, and we had an enthralling interview. He was delightful, so full of wisdom and stories, and as the horses on his shed row stomped and nickered and neighed behind him, we talked on and on. To a man who has been interviewed thousands of times, I was surely not memorable, but to me, speaking with Billy was the honor of a lifetime. I have never forgotten a moment of it. A few weeks ago, I began thinking of him again, wondering how he was doing. I decided to call him.

When he answered the phone and I told him who I was, he lit up. Fearing I’d be an imposition, I'd planned only a brief chat, but once we started talking horse, minutes became magical hours. The ghost of Slew and so many other horses came alive again. Here was Ruffian, swooshing past him in the last workout of her brilliant, too-brief life, leaving a trail of hoofprints he still remembered. There was indomitable old Kelso, fighting to the finish on the Belmont grass and giving Turner, then a nearly penniless jockey, a win ticket that paid for his next meal. The behemoth Forego. The incomparable Secretariat. And of course Turner’s beloved Slew, so supremely imperious that other horses were visibly terrified of him. Billy remembered him standing in the starting gate and drawing so deep a breath into his massive lungs that his jockey felt his legs pushed out over the ribs and wondered if the horse would explode. A moment later, when the gate opened, so he did.

When Slew was in his dotage, Billy went to see him. The two hadn’t been together in years. As Billy walked into the shed row, the old horse heard his voice, came to the door of his stall and looked for him. As Billy came to him, Slew let out a deep, affectionate nicker. Slew stretched out his head in greeting, and Billy gave him a gentle fist bump to the nose, as he used to when both he and the horse were young.

Billy was profoundly moved; even after all those years, Slew knew and loved him. Billy believed the stallion was thinking of their glorious youth and hoping Billy would take him out so he could win the Derby again.

Yesterday afternoon, Billy Turner passed away at the age of 81. Godspeed to a brilliant and deeply caring horseman, and as kind a man as I ever met.

Photo by Jessica Rich

12/31/2021

We wish you all a new year filled with growth, peace, and brighter vistas. ❤️

#happynewyear #farmlife #yeahthatgreenville #bramblewoodstables #horses #healing #growth #love

We wish you all a new year filled with growth, peace, and brighter vistas. ❤️

#happynewyear #farmlife #yeahthatgreenville #bramblewoodstables #horses #healing #growth #love

12/29/2021

We are looking to add another riding instructor to our passionate team of career trainers. Bramblewood Stables is a busy horseback riding school that is founded on dressage principles and is known for bringing along students slowly. Our instructors are not competition-focused and our talent is building strong foundations. If you're a seasoned pro who enjoys teaching beginners and/or EAL, this spot is perfect for you. If you're a newer instructor or would like to explore teaching as a career path, our team is here to mentor you.

Timeline Photos 12/29/2021

Timeline Photos

robichon de la gueriniere was an french 18th century dressage master. a lot of what we do today stems from him. one day, when la gueriniere had become known as a master, a nobleman approached him wanting him to train his son.
"I dont want you to make him a master or anything,' the nobleman said. 'just teach him to be able to put his horse's feet where he wants them to go, more or less."
'ah yes,' said la gueriniere; ' the very same thing i have been trying to do myself these past 60 years."

12/23/2021

We been having lots of conversations in the barn about the power of admitting our fears and vulnerabilities. Once we speak them out loud, their power diminishes.

Jumping for joy? Alas, no.

One of my most shameful secrets stems from a long ago wreck I had with Montcalm—my beautiful 14:2 Thoroughbred, shown here in an old family album—the day he caught his front end on a solid fence and cartwheeled into the ground. At the time, I was a well-taught, enthusiastic and very capable teen. I landed squarely underneath Monty, of course, and by the time I was healed up enough to try it again, I’d been accepted as a fulltime student under the German dressage teacher who would forever change me.

Riding with Mrs. Boerschmann was a rare and wonderful opportunity but it had its drawbacks.

Instead of dusting myself off and getting back in the game, I never jumped again, unless you count bouncing my teacher's client horses over the odd set of cavaletti. Nope. Instead, I’ve had decades to replay the same split second over ‘n’ over ‘n’ over… and the upshot is, when it comes to jumping horses, I’ve lost my nerve.

I was thinking about this last night—in the darkness, clutching my little blankie—after reading a message from a follower who’d read a recent post and said to me, “My God, you’re brave.”

Well, not so much. You see, I’ve got things that I’m scared of, too! Jumping is the big one; I also know it will be a frosty Friday before I ever get behind a fresh team of Percherons on an empty hayrack, which is a whole other miracle of survival, right there.

Truth is, we all have our little somethings.

If we have a certain amount of intelligence and imagination, our nerves can get the better of us. I know that someday I will want to get over my jumping roadblock, if ever I have the pleasure of again riding a point 'n' shoot jumper, along with a teacher I can trust. Well, that and if ever I get my custom Vogels on, again… but that’s a whole other shame story!

Meanwhile, I know that there are many, many able people who can fill my jumping hole, whilst I take on the schooling of these horses and then, writing about it. Sharing my little stories with each of you. That's a fair trade, when I think about it. In this world, we all have that one special thing we are meant to do.

Let's just admit that once we’ve walked this earth a while, we will have our vulnerabilities.

No one is immune and sometimes, these hurts make us more compassionate teachers, trainers and way smarter riders. Mostly, I've learned that the power of shame dissipates the minute we talk about it and bring it to light… before someone else, some bully, does it for us.

So. If you’ve something heavy that burdens your heart and therefore, your horsemanship, I invite you to lay it down here, a safe place among friends. After all, it’s Christmas. The best gift we can share with others is that of a peaceful heart.

***

PS: If you’ve time for a virtual coffee, I'd be ever so grateful, thanks: buymeacoffee.com/horsewoman.

📷 Joy Duncan.

12/21/2021

May we all experience the world with the sort of wonder that little chestnut quarter horses have by simply being.

#bramblewoodstables #quarterhorse #farmlife #cheerfulnihilism #hopefulcynicism #love

May we all experience the world with the sort of wonder that little chestnut quarter horses have by simply being.

#bramblewoodstables #quarterhorse #farmlife #cheerfulnihilism #hopefulcynicism #love

Our Story

We respect our riders’ privacy, so please only visit the farm by appointment.

Videos (show all)

Create your family's farmhouse style this holiday season by incorporating Bramblewood into your family's photos. Using t...
Setting Hero up for a positive outcome, time and patience reduce his fear triggers. We’re experimenting with quiet sessi...
Toby sucks on his tongue after eating peppermints.

Location

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175 McConnell Rd
Taylors, SC
29687-5402
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