Sandhills Dojo Shorei-Kan Okinawan Budo Kaisai-do

Sandhills Dojo teaches Self Defense, Respect and Discipline as well as physical well being through the use of Goju-Ryu Shorei-Kan Karate and Okinawan Kobudo. Sensei's Pam & Tom Theis

[05/20/20]   Grandmaster Seikichi Toguchi. Kancho Toguchi was not only one of Master Chojun Miyagi’s top students, he implemented Master Miyagi’s vision of creating additional katas to bridge the gaps in the nascent Goju-Ryu system.

In Goju Ryu there are 12 core katas. However, in Shorei-kan there are 9 additional katas that were created specifically by Toguchi Sensei. The role that Toguchi Sensei has played in creating katas to supplement those taught by Miyagi Sensei is not generally known. During the time that Miyagi Sensei was alive, he had started the streamlining of karate katas by creating basic introductory katas for school children, called 'Fukyugata'. Miyagi Sensei created two Fukyugata, called Gekisai Dai Ichi & Gekisai Dai Ni. However, Miyagi Sensei passed away before completing his goal of adding more katas to bridge the gap between these Fukyugata and the other Kihongata & Kaishugata.

Toguchi Sensei took it upon himself to ensure that Miyagi Sensei's dream did not go unfulfilled. After Miyagi Sensei passed away and his seniormost students opened their own dojos, Toguchi Sensei's dojo was one of the first to receive American G.I's and he wanted to ensure that people who attended his dojo could be taught in a systematic, progressive manner that would make it easy for them to learn and practice. To do this, he created 3 Fukyugata. These were originally called Fukyukata Dai Ichi, Fukyokata Dai Ni & Fukyukata Dai San. However, because of the American mispronunciation of 'Fukyu' (sounded like a swear word), he changed the name to 'Hookyu', thus these became the Hookyukata series. This was then followed by Gekisai dai ichi and ni. Toguchi Sensei then created Gekisai Dai San, which introduced the double-hand chudan-uke at the start of the kata (to link the fukyugata to the kihongata of Sanchin & Tensho). This was followed by Gekiha Dai Ichi & Gekiha Dai Ni. Each progressive kata was designed to introduce the karateka to a new technique, stance, or progression of block, etc. In this manner, Toguchi Sensei created a system that allowed the karateka to be systematically introduced to progression in a linear, simplistic, traceable system.

Apart from these kata, he created Kakuha Dai Ichi & Kakuha Dai Ni and created the bunkai for the entire curriculum. The last kata he created was the 'Hakutsuru No Mai' (Dance of the White Crane). This kata was created based on a dream that Miyagi Sensei had of a White Crane and Toguchi Sensei created this kata in honour of his Sensei. This kata also references Goju Ryu's origins from Fujian White Crane boxing. Today, most Goju Ryu schools had adopted Toguchi Sensei's bunkais (he created contiguous bunkai to match the flow of the kata, from start to finish. Prior to this bunkai was practiced only a short series of movements and not in a continuous flow) and kiso-kumite as part of their syllabus and this is his greatest legacy, but one that few people are aware of.

We at Shorei-kan are torch-bearers of that legacy and share in the pride of one of the great lineages in karate. Today we join hands with our Shorei-kan family around the world to celebrate the birth anniversary of one of the greatest karate masters in history and someone we are so blessed to call our Kancho.

Shorei-kan Karate India & Asia

Today we join hands with our Shorei-kan family around the world, to celebrate the 103rd birth anniversary of our founder, Grandmaster Seikichi Toguchi. Kancho Toguchi was not only one of Master Chojun Miyagi’s top students, he implemented Master Miyagi’s vision of creating additional katas to bridge the gaps in the nascent Goju-Ryu system.

In Goju Ryu there are 12 core katas. However, in Shorei-kan there are 9 additional katas that were created specifically by Toguchi Sensei. The role that Toguchi Sensei has played in creating katas to supplement those taught by Miyagi Sensei is not generally known. During the time that Miyagi Sensei was alive, he had started the streamlining of karate katas by creating basic introductory katas for school children, called 'Fukyugata'. Miyagi Sensei created two Fukyugata, called Gekisai Dai Ichi & Gekisai Dai Ni. However, Miyagi Sensei passed away before completing his goal of adding more katas to bridge the gap between these Fukyugata and the other Kihongata & Kaishugata.

Toguchi Sensei took it upon himself to ensure that Miyagi Sensei's dream did not go unfulfilled. After Miyagi Sensei passed away and his seniormost students opened their own dojos, Toguchi Sensei's dojo was one of the first to receive American G.I's and he wanted to ensure that people who attended his dojo could be taught in a systematic, progressive manner that would make it easy for them to learn and practice. To do this, he created 3 Fukyugata. These were originally called Fukyukata Dai Ichi, Fukyokata Dai Ni & Fukyukata Dai San. However, because of the American mispronunciation of 'Fukyu' (sounded like a swear word), he changed the name to 'Hookyu', thus these became the Hookyukata series. This was then followed by Gekisai dai ichi and ni. Toguchi Sensei then created Gekisai Dai San, which introduced the double-hand chudan-uke at the start of the kata (to link the fukyugata to the kihongata of Sanchin & Tensho). This was followed by Gekiha Dai Ichi & Gekiha Dai Ni. Each progressive kata was designed to introduce the karateka to a new technique, stance, or progression of block, etc. In this manner, Toguchi Sensei created a system that allowed the karateka to be systematically introduced to progression in a linear, simplistic, traceable system.

Apart from these kata, he created Kakuha Dai Ichi & Kakuha Dai Ni and created the bunkai for the entire curriculum. The last kata he created was the 'Hakutsuru No Mai' (Dance of the White Crane). This kata was created based on a dream that Miyagi Sensei had of a White Crane and Toguchi Sensei created this kata in honour of his Sensei. This kata also references Goju Ryu's origins from Fujian White Crane boxing. Today, most Goju Ryu schools had adopted Toguchi Sensei's bunkais (he created contiguous bunkai to match the flow of the kata, from start to finish. Prior to this bunkai was practiced only a short series of movements and not in a continuous flow) and kiso-kumite as part of their syllabus and this is his greatest legacy, but one that few people are aware of.

We at Shorei-kan are torch-bearers of that legacy and share in the pride of one of the great lineages in karate. Today we join hands with our Shorei-kan family around the world to celebrate the birth anniversary of one of the greatest karate masters in history and someone we are so blessed to call our Kancho.

Happy Birthday Sensei!

[03/17/20]   Sorry, no classes tonight 😞.

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healthyaging.net

Karate? It is Never Too Late - Healthy Aging ®

Never to late !

healthyaging.net never too late for karate

healthyaging.net

Karate? It is Never Too Late - Healthy Aging ®

It’s never to late.

healthyaging.net never too late for karate

Karate viewpoints

theconversation.com

Martial arts can improve your attention span and alertness long term – new study

Another good reason !

theconversation.com Martial arts help boost both brain and body.

whistlekick.com

Self-Control, Not Violence, is the Result of Teaching Martial Arts to Young Kids

Self control

whistlekick.com The reason why Martial Arts is a beloved art form and way of life is because of the beautiful paradox that it presents. Martial arts is all about learning to fight so that you don’t have to. Wait, what?! Yes, it is true. The main and most crucial lesson that Martial Arts teaches is for one to know...

Karate viewpoints

[12/07/19]   Monastery-Kan Dojo-Kun: the rules of the dojo.

Our Karate is part of the budo (wǔ dào), the Japanese martial way that includes several Japanese martial arts. The term budo is translatable with " via Della Guerra " or " via that leads to peace ". both translations are combined with the characteristics of budo, and therefore of the school monastery-Kan: we learn a fighting art but with the goal To avoid any conflict. We learn the war committing to peace. The Martial Arts part of budo do not therefore have the aim of the exclusive progress from a technical point of view, but alongside the latter a spiritual and mental growth of the practitioner, based on solid ethical and moral principles In the same term karate-Do (kōng shǒu dào), the last kanji is that of via, intended as a personal growth path that is combined with technical progress and that should guide us in our daily lives, inside and outside the dojo
The Basic principles of the monastery-kan school are enclosed in the six points of the dojo-kun, the rules of the These are six principles, of equal importance, that the student must strive to do their own and apply in every situation of their daily life.
The first point, " first of all, always be gracious and humble ", reflects the spirit and the name of our " school of courtesy and good manners ".
Interesting is the double possibility of interpretation of the third point, " first, learn to be patient ". here, the Japanese term nintai (rěn nài), translated as " patience ", can also be made with " perseverance ": a patience Therefore, it is the single moment in which to brake the negative emotions of anger and anger, both to the constancy and commitment necessary to progress in the martial way and in all the areas of daily life that require prolonged effort over time. With this last interpretation, the third point invites us to always keep our goals in front of our eyes and to pursue them, we will be able to overcome the difficulties we will

In the next post, the dojo-kun will take us to discover the meaning of the name of our

" if you know how to smile, what's the point of fighting?"

Hit the translation button.

Lo Shōrei-Kan sbarca in Europa con Tamano Toshio sensei.

Tamano Toshio (Tōkyo, 14 settembre 1942) iniziò a seguire i corsi tenuti da Toguchi sensei a Tōkyō nel 1960. Dopo alcuni anni, si trasferì a Okinawa, iniziando ad insegnare nel Dōjō di Toguchi sensei a Koza. Negli anni a Okinawa, Tamano sensei ebbe anche l’opportunità di studiare l’arte del Kobudō di Okinawa (沖縄古武道), “Antica arte marziale di Okinawa”, la quale prevede l’utilizzo di armi tradizionali. I suoi maestri furono due tra i più grandi della storia di quest’arte marziale: i sensei Matayoshi Shinpō e Akamine Eisuke. Dalla sintesi di questi studi, e dal proprio sviluppo personale, Tamano sensei estese il sistema Shōrei-Kan anche al Kobudō, creando il metodo Shōrei-Kai.
Nel 1969, Tamano sensei venne inviato dal suo maestro a New York City per guidare il pre-esistente Dōjō della Grande Mela e, nel 1971, fu nominato responsabile per gli Stati Uniti. Tamano sensei rimase negli USA oltre dieci anni, contribuendo a formare insegnanti e creando una rete di Dōjō ben consolidata.
Nel 1982, si trasferì a Milano e, l’anno successivo, Toguchi sensei lo nominò 7° dan e gli conferì il titolo onorifico di Shihan per l’impegno profuso nella diffusione della scuola. Inoltre, nel 1986, Toguchi sensei, affidò al maestro Tamano la direzione dello Shōrei-Kan Europe.
Nel 1990, Tamano sensei lasciò l’Italia trasferendosi in Francia dove vive tuttora.
Toguchi sensei morì nel 1998. Con la scomparsa del suo fondatore, la scuola vide una scissione interna e Tamano sensei fu riconosciuto kanchō (caposcuola) delle scuole europee e di parte di quelle del continente americano.
Ad oggi, Tamano sensei coordina e dirige le attività dello Shōrei-Kan Europe, tenendo frequenti seminari in Italia, Spagna e Francia.
Al Maestro Tamano si devono la creazione di nuovi kata e kumite, il diffondersi del Karate Shōrei-Kan e del Kobudo in America e in Europa, l'ampliamento del sistema Shōrei-Kan e la stesura di vari libri.
Con il post di oggi, si conclude la storia dalla genesi del Karate allo Shōrei-Kan odierno. Il futuro è ancora da scrivere!

Nel prossimo post: Dōjō-Kun, le regole del Dōjō.

In foto: Tamano Toshio

parade.com

Why You and Your Kids Should Do Karate—It Fights Anxiety, Prevents Bullying and More

parade.com For most people, the word karate conjures up images of martial arts flicks and Ralph Macchio’s famous tournament-winning Crane kick. But for those who practice the ancient discipline, it’s about so much more. “It’s a mind, body and spirit practice that brings benefits like fitness, mental di...

[11/26/19]   NO School, NO Classes... Sorry :(

Shoreikan Karate Club

A Movie clip of Master Toguchi and Hirakawa Sensei in Canada mid 80's filmed at Delta High School in BC, and also at Langley School in Fort Langley BC

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Truth

Jesse Enkamp

Get it? 👊

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Sansei Shuri International

Booooooooooommmmmmm

Yoshin Project

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thedojoshorinkan.wordpress.com

Understanding Dojo Etiquette

thedojoshorinkan.wordpress.com One of the most unusual and hard things for both students and parents to adjust to when beginning martial arts training is the etiquette in the dojo. A dojo is a place of learning in whic…

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PEACEFUL WARRIOR BLACK BELT CLUB

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Toguchi sensei

Early demo containing elements of Taiso Daruma & Sepai kata www.jissokan.com www.jissokn.blogspot.com

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Academy of Traditional Fighting Arts

Humility

"Humility", IOGKF newsletter 1995.

Shotokan Path

Different parts of your Gi and what they are called. English and in Japanese.

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The History and Evolution of Shorei-Kan Goju-Ryu Karate by Ichiro Naito and Scott Lenzi Okinawan Goju-Ryu Karate is unusual in the martial arts world because it employs both hard and soft techniques with equal effectiveness. Yet the system is not limited to simple punching or kicking; it incorporates locks, holds, and throws which are strongly influenced by several of the Chinese animal forms. Goju-Ryu can be traced to the Fukien Province of China. Though there are many theories as to how the art came to Okinawa, the person credited with its introduction is Kanryo Higashionna (1853-1917). As a young man, Higashionna was a sailor on the Shinko-Sen, a ship which regularly traded with China. On one of these visits, he saved a drowning child who turned out to be the son of a noted pugilist named Liu. In appreciation, the grateful boxer began instructing the young Okinawan in the art of Chinese boxing. Higashionna remained and studied in China for approximately 15 years and then returned to teach on his native island. It was during this period in Okinawa that Higashionna modified the techniques learned in China to suit his people and thus created naha-te, derived from combining the name of the Okinawan city of Naha with te, the native barehand fighting technique. Among Higashionna's top students were Chojun Miyagi and Juhatsu Kyoda. Miyagi, being independently wealthy, was able to devote his life to the study of the martial arts and he further developed and refined the principles set forth by his teacher. He created the simplified forms, gekisai number one and two, as well as the openhand kata tensho. Although a renowned technician, Miyagi's major accomplishment was his formulation of a more cohesive system which would allow penetration into deeper and more advanced techniques of naha-te. Additionally, Miyagi was responsible for creating the name goju-ryu. At the first martial arts convention held in Kyoto, Japan in 1930, Miyagi sent student Jinan Shinzato as his representative. Since there were many martial artists attending who represented schools with impressive sounding names, Shinzato, not wanting to feel humbled, had to invent the name hanko-ryu (half-hard style) on the spot for his art. Later, when Shinzato related this to his teacher, Miyagi decided to use the name goju-ryu (hard-soft style), which was taken from a poem in the ancient martial arts text Bubishi. Miyagi's curriculum consisted of four major components: Tee chikata mani This referred to the study of solo forms, the traditional kata which combined various karate techniques into a moving sequence. These forms included koryu, or classical kata such as sanchin, saifa, and seisan, which originated in China. Miyagi also developed the hookiyo (standardized) and kihon (basic) kata to allow a more progressive approach to the koryo forms. Kumite There was no freestyle kumite (sparring) in Miyagi's program, just prearranged combat practice enabling two persons to perform a kata together in order to experience the physical meaning of the form, and to see how the techniques could be used against actual attackers. This form is accurately called bunkai kumite. Both kihon and koryo kata have specific bunkai kumite. Te tochimani This study consisted of short, two-man prearranged fighting exercises, each with its own special ending technique. It was used as a beginning approximation for real fighting situations. In today's practice, this form is also called kiso kumite. Ikukumi This last component involved real combat practice, but was set up in such a way that the students were not injured. The junior was allowed to attack with any technique to any part of the senior's body without restraining kicks or punches. The senior man could block or dodge, but was not allowed to initiate any counterattack. Finally, when he saw an opening, the senior jumped in and pushed the junior back with the palm of his hand. The senior student accordingly had to master a tremendous number of techniques in order to use them instantaneously. Since scoring points was of no interest, the senior's counterattack had to be final and decisive. It generally took a minimum of ten years to reach this level. In 1933, the Dai Nippon Butoukai (Greater Japan Martial Virtues Association) was formed and Miyagi was named the Okinawan representative. He presented his article, "An Outline of Karate-Do," at one of the organization's meetings and was subsequently awarded the title "Karate Master" by the emperor. Miyagi thus became the first master so designated in the karate world. Miyagi had a number of talented, dedicated students such as Seiko Higa, Seikichi Toguchi, and Meitoku Yagi, who have all developed esteemed reputations in their own right. In the years before Miyagi's death, Toguchi remained with his instructor and other senior students and was given further insight into Miyagi's principles and theories. Shortly after Miyagi's death in 1953, Toguchi decided to carry on the principles of his teacher and formed the Shorei-Kan (school to respect courtesy and manners) Okinawan Goju-Ryu Karate-Do. He opened the first Shorei-Kan dojo (school) in Naha city in 1955, and since it was very close to a U.S. Army base, many American GIs came to study. Because of the introduction of Westerners into the Okinawan dojo, Toguchi realized the need for more development of the existing system. The forms of gekiha, kakuha and, bunkai were thus created. Tohuchi further developed goju-ryu by creating a number of advanced supplementary training methods. A typical Shorei-Kan class in the late 50s (and still today) consisted of the following: Preparatory exercises to warm up the body for karate movements. Supplementary exercises to practice the basic techniques in kata. Kata, bunkai, and kiso kumite practice. Application of kata techniques. Toguchi also created hakutsuru no mai, a kata adapted from the original Chinese white crane form which is performed to music. The kata and subsequent bunkai tell the story of a white crane fighting a snake. This beautiful form is rarely seen in the United States and is known only to a small number of goju-ryu practitioners. Toguchi's classes were noted for their strictness and discipline, a practice still common in goju-ryu today. HIs system did not utilize free sparring, but fighting on several forms, the most important and difficult being ikukumi. Proponents of the Shorei-Kan system believe their approach has several advantages when compared to styles which utilize mostly kata and jiyu kumite (freestyle sparring), simply because of certain detailed studies which include: extraction and application of kata techniques, logical progression of techniques, variety of advanced techniques, and safety of training methodology. The meanings of forms are extracted and analyzed via a series of progressive kata and their respective bunkai kumite. The bunkai is arranged so that the student actually executes the specific self-defense application of each kata with his partner. The student progresses through a series of kata and bunkai, each successive form building on the one before. This progression of techniques was originally designed by Miyagi and was further developed by Toguchi. In this way, the student learns new techniques but still practices, maintains, and sharpens earlier skills. At the black belt level, students begin the koryu bunkai kumite, which are the bunkai to kata such as seiyunchin or seipai. At this stage, kaisai kumite is also introduced. Similar to bunkai, kaisai is an analysis of the application for a specific motion in the kata. According to Toguchi, a student first learns the mechanics, and then after a time the kata becomes part of the practitioner. Only at this point can application of the motions become apparent and, more importantly, a part of the martial artist. At this level, the kata has a meaning and is no longer a mere routine. A good analogy of kaisai might be learning to catch a ball: initially it requires a great deal of concentration. But with continued practice, catching becomes a natural reaction. With further refinement, if you were thrown a ball of fire, you would not only be able to react as if to catch it, but also to ascertain its nature and move out of the way. Achieving this state of subconscious action requires a great many years of practice, since karate is not as simple as catching a ball. A variety of techniques can be practiced using the Shorei-Kan system. By placing a significant emphasis on kata, bunkai, and kiso kumite, the Shorei-Kan student practices all techniques alone and in forms with partners. This study includes unusual or dangerous techniques which cannot be practiced during a freestyle sparring match. Normally, freestyle sparring requires the use of techniques which are comparatively simple and applied only to limited target areas. Therefore a karate student who engages exclusively in freestyle sparring will, for the most part, practice straight punches, a variety of high (above groin) kicks, and little else. While this approach might be good for tournament competition, targets and techniques more conducive to self-defense situations are not explored. On the other hand, the Shorei-Kan student practices throws, elbow techniques, locks, finger strikes, and more, with full power and without restraint. Since these techniques are executed with a partner, both offensive, defensive, and counteroffensive moves are explored. Safety has always been an important part of the Shorei-Kan training method. Emphasis on prearranged sequences will mean less chance of injury, a common occurrence in many dojo. Injuries occurring in martial arts classes can usually be avoided if adequate measures to protect practitioners are taken. Training in martial arts should be beneficial, healthy, and fun. Through many years of diligent practice of kata, bunkai, and kiso kumite, and a variety of advanced training exercises, the Shorei-Kan student absorbs a wide variety of techniques. These disciplined practices develop the student's spirit, enlightenment and self-knowledge, the goal of all the martial arts. We can look to many of the Okinawan karateka such as Seikichi Toguchi and see the real essence of karate-do goju-ryu – humility, happiness, health and sincerity – all of which were exemplified by the great Chojun Miyagi.

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