Jefferson Arsenal

Jefferson Arsenal

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Buckshot paper cartridges for the blunderbuss, using a kit from Jefferson Arsenal.
Hey, when will y'all have .662 balls on the website again? I'm finally running low and need to restock! Thanks!!
Many thanks for your Brown Bess kit. I've made the paper cartridge using your kit seen in the image (4th object down). I'm also very privileged to own an original British (1750-1770) Cartridge Box containing a wooden mandrel for forming the cartridge and a tin plate powder measure (top three images) for comparison purposes to your kit.
Will you be carrying the minie to fit the new Pedersoli Lorenz?
Just wanted to share this picture with y'all. Your lead got the job done of opening day of muzzleloader here in Tennessee. Dropped him with my 1842 Springfield, and followed up with the 1858 Re*****on. Thank y'all, and I will be ordering more in the future!
Hey! Been snooping around the website and I'm about to order some .662 balls for my musket. I found under the .44 cal revolver cartridge boxes to check out some .450 conicals. Well, I can't seem to find them on the website anywhere, and I may be interested in a few!
Have you ever thought of doing a buckshot video on YouTube?

Functional and authentic reproduction ammunition from the American Civil War era.

Operating as usual

08/28/2021

As many of my loyal customers know, The Jefferson Arsenal is proudly a veteran owned company. What you may not know is that I served as a Marine Rifleman in Helmand Province, Afghanistan in 2009-10. While deployed, we conducted two missions: to locate and destroy the Taliban, and to help the Afghan security forces and civilians.

We spent much of our time providing help to the locals. We established relationships with them and tried our best to help their communities in whatever way we could. I'll never forget the look on an Afghan boy's face as he tried American candy for the first time, or the extreme joy of a young girl who was now able to get the education she deserved. I learned that these were the same kind of people trying to live a life free of terror and extremism as those we were protecting back home. They are not just our allies, but our friends. And they need our help now more than ever.

Our community has seen an influx of Afghans arriving to begin a new life, far away from everyone and everything they've known.
The Lutheran Social Services of the DMV have committed themselves to serving these people. The charity is expecting to provide housing and supplies to over 800 arriving Afghans in the next 2 months and are working directly with the communities, no matter their denomination, to provide whatever support they need.

Here at The Jefferson Arsenal, I am carrying the same sentiment I carried in Afghanistan. Between today, August 28th, and next Friday, September 3rd, I will be donating 100% of our profits to this cause.

We deeply appreciate your orders at this time. Please share this post to encourage others to shop to help the cause.

You can also donate here directly: https://lssnca.org/take_action/donate-afghan-allies.html
Or do as my wife and I have done and sign up to volunteer your time to this charity. They need airport pickups, home set-up, as well as food and clothing donations.
https://lssnca.org/take_action/volunteer.html

It seems to be on the people now to do the right thing by our Afghan friends. After all they've been through, they are truly deserving of our help and a chance to start a new life here. Thank you all for your support. Please pray for Afghanistan, our troops, and our great country.

As many of my loyal customers know, The Jefferson Arsenal is proudly a veteran owned company. What you may not know is that I served as a Marine Rifleman in Helmand Province, Afghanistan in 2009-10. While deployed, we conducted two missions: to locate and destroy the Taliban, and to help the Afghan security forces and civilians.

We spent much of our time providing help to the locals. We established relationships with them and tried our best to help their communities in whatever way we could. I'll never forget the look on an Afghan boy's face as he tried American candy for the first time, or the extreme joy of a young girl who was now able to get the education she deserved. I learned that these were the same kind of people trying to live a life free of terror and extremism as those we were protecting back home. They are not just our allies, but our friends. And they need our help now more than ever.

Our community has seen an influx of Afghans arriving to begin a new life, far away from everyone and everything they've known.
The Lutheran Social Services of the DMV have committed themselves to serving these people. The charity is expecting to provide housing and supplies to over 800 arriving Afghans in the next 2 months and are working directly with the communities, no matter their denomination, to provide whatever support they need.

Here at The Jefferson Arsenal, I am carrying the same sentiment I carried in Afghanistan. Between today, August 28th, and next Friday, September 3rd, I will be donating 100% of our profits to this cause.

We deeply appreciate your orders at this time. Please share this post to encourage others to shop to help the cause.

You can also donate here directly: https://lssnca.org/take_action/donate-afghan-allies.html
Or do as my wife and I have done and sign up to volunteer your time to this charity. They need airport pickups, home set-up, as well as food and clothing donations.
https://lssnca.org/take_action/volunteer.html

It seems to be on the people now to do the right thing by our Afghan friends. After all they've been through, they are truly deserving of our help and a chance to start a new life here. Thank you all for your support. Please pray for Afghanistan, our troops, and our great country.

05/21/2021

We're back in business!

Amanda and I had a wonderful wedding and honeymoon, and we're back to work just in time for campaigning season. Click the link below to view our full collection of historically accurate, fully functional products!

www.TheJeffersonArsenal.com

Below: Amanda displaying a great example of a punt gun that we found on our honeymoon to Tybee Island, Georgia. These guns were used to harvest massive amounts of waterfowl with a single shot. (No, we don't currently offer cartridges for these guns!)

We're back in business!

Amanda and I had a wonderful wedding and honeymoon, and we're back to work just in time for campaigning season. Click the link below to view our full collection of historically accurate, fully functional products!

www.TheJeffersonArsenal.com

Below: Amanda displaying a great example of a punt gun that we found on our honeymoon to Tybee Island, Georgia. These guns were used to harvest massive amounts of waterfowl with a single shot. (No, we don't currently offer cartridges for these guns!)

04/27/2021

Dear subscribers,

Thank you all for your continued interest in The Jefferson Arsenal! It’s my honor to announce that next week, I’ll be getting married to the love of my life, Amanda. For those of you who have shot N-SSA for the past couple of years, you may remember Amanda as the beautiful young lady who was expertly handling the Arsenal’s books during those often rainy weekends. She has been with The Jefferson Arsenal since our humble beginnings and has seen us through to the success that we now enjoy. I look forward to many more years of the same devoted companionship that she has blessed me with so far.

That being said, we are taking a few weeks to enjoy the beginning of our next chapter in life together. The Jefferson Arsenal will be back up and running before the end of May, after which we will be proud to continue to offer you the finest and most affordable historically correct ammunition for your smoke pole of choice.

Thank you again for your continued support, and we’ll see you in a few weeks!

- Jon

Dear subscribers,

Thank you all for your continued interest in The Jefferson Arsenal! It’s my honor to announce that next week, I’ll be getting married to the love of my life, Amanda. For those of you who have shot N-SSA for the past couple of years, you may remember Amanda as the beautiful young lady who was expertly handling the Arsenal’s books during those often rainy weekends. She has been with The Jefferson Arsenal since our humble beginnings and has seen us through to the success that we now enjoy. I look forward to many more years of the same devoted companionship that she has blessed me with so far.

That being said, we are taking a few weeks to enjoy the beginning of our next chapter in life together. The Jefferson Arsenal will be back up and running before the end of May, after which we will be proud to continue to offer you the finest and most affordable historically correct ammunition for your smoke pole of choice.

Thank you again for your continued support, and we’ll see you in a few weeks!

- Jon

10/08/2020

Making Brown Bess Paper Cartridges

Here’s black powder expert Mike Beliveau trying his hand at making cartridges with our Brown Bess kit. Nice job, Mike!

In this video I’ll be making military style paper cartridges for the Brown Bess musket. I’ll be using a Brown Bess paper cartridge kit from the Jefferson Ars...

gunsamerica.com 10/06/2020

The Musket that Changed the World: The Land Pattern "Brown Bess" - GunsAmerica Digest

Did you know that the Brown Bess musket was one of the longest serving infantry fi****ms in world history? Mark Miller of GunsAmerica recently published a comprehensive article on the ‘Bess featuring The Jefferson Arsenal’s paper cartridge kits. Read the article here:

https://www.gunsamerica.com/digest/the-musket-that-changed-the-world-the-land-pattern-brown-bess/

gunsamerica.com The Land Pattern Musket and its derivatives were in use for 116 years of official service and close to 160 years of actual use with many incremental changes in its design. It remained in production for 140 years, making the Brown Bess' production one of the longest production runs for a firearm in h...

07/27/2020

During the Battle of Antietam, the fighting in and around the infamous “sunken road,” was demoniacal in its fury. In three hours of chaotic action, 5,500 soldiers were killed or wounded. Colonel Edward Ephraim Cross, commanding the 5th New Hampshire Regiment, was among those caught up in the ferocity of the combat. One of his lieutenants later recalled the scene:

“As the fight grew furious the Colonel cried out 'Put on the war paint!' ...Taking the cue somehow we rubbed the torn ends of cartridges over our faces, streaking them with powder like a pack of Indians and the Colonel, to complete the similarity, cried out, 'Give 'em the war whoop' and all of us joined him in the Indian war whoop until it must have rung out amid the thunder of the ordinance.”

Colonel Cross was among those wounded at the sunken road. Though the Confederate lines were broken, the Union forces lacked the momentum to exploit the breakthrough because of the tremendous number of casualties they sustained in the assault. Two days after the battle, Alexander Gardner took a shocking photograph of the Rebel dead along the road, which was thereafter remembered menacingly as “Bloody Lane.”

- - -

Further reading:

McPherson, J. M. (2003). Crossroads of freedom: The battle that changed the course of the American Civil War. London: Penguin.

Photographs:

Alexander Gardner’s photograph of Confederate dead at Bloody Lane.

“Bloody Lane,” from the Antietam National Battlefield website.

07/20/2020

The Model 1857 “Napoleon” 12-pounder field gun has often been referred to as the workhorse of Civil War field artillery due to its versatility and widespread use in both the Union and Confederate armies.

Developed in France and named after Emperor Napoleon III, the Model 1857 was a smooth bore cannon which could fire a variety of lethal projectiles. In December, 1862, shortly before the Battle of Fredericksburg, General Robert E. Lee named the Napoleon as one of “the best guns for field service,” adding that “the contest between our six-pounder smoothbores and the 12-pounder Napoleons of the enemy is very unequal.”

Yankee artillery gained a fearsome reputation on the battlefield during the Civil War. At the Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862, Union guns under the deft command of artillerist Henry Hunt delivered a withering fire upon the attacking Rebels, inflicting many of the 5,000 Southern casualties suffered that day. Confederate General D.H. Hill remarked in the aftermath that “It was not war, it was murder.”

Today, 12-pounder Napoleons are a common site on America’s preserved Civil War battlefields. They can be readily identified based on their pale green color, long gun tubes, and smooth bores. Union-made guns have a flare at the muzzle, whereas most Napoleons of Southern manufacture do not.

- - -

Images: Union and Confederate examples of the Model 1857 “Napoleon” at Gettysburg National Military Park. The gun tubes are both Civil War-era, but the carriages are reproductions. The National Park Service asks visitors to admire these relics while remembering not to climb upon them.

Further reading:

Thomas, D. S. (1999). Cannons: An introduction to Civil War artillery. Gettysburg, PA: Thomas Publications.

07/10/2020

Brown Bess Cartridge Tutorial

The British Land Pattern Musket, also known as the Brown Bess, was one of the longest-serving infantry fi****ms in world history. This video will guide you through the process of constructing historically correct, fully functional paper cartridges for this venerable musket. The “DIY” kits featured in the video are available at www.thejeffersonarsenal.com.

https://youtu.be/FeBogBxr2C

How to construct your own period-correct, fully functional paper cartridges for your 0.75 caliber Brown Bess Musket. For use in conjunction with The Jefferso...

04/29/2020

By the time of the Civil War, dentistry was a new and rapidly expanding profession in the United States. The first dental school in the country had opened in 1840 with just five students enrolled; by 1860, there were two more schools with a total of four hundred graduates, plus over five thousand individuals nationwide who were registered as dentists.

Oral hygiene was important to the soldiers of both armies during the war. Even with decreasing standards for enlistment as the conflict dragged on, poor dental health could disqualify potential recruits for both medical and tactical reasons. Doctor Roberts Bartholow, one of America’s leading physicians of the day, aptly identified two reasons that soldiers should have healthy teeth in his 1863 Manual of Instructions for Enlisting and Discharging Soldiers. He suggested that “a loss of a sufficient number of teeth [would] prevent proper mastication of food and tearing the cartridge.”

The first reason that Dr. Bartholow provides doubtlessly refers to “army bread,” more commonly known today as hard tack, which was notoriously difficult to chew even with a fully functional set of teeth. Many soldiers needed to crush the wafers with the butts of their rifles and soak the pieces in water or coffee before being able to eat them. The doctor’s second reason refers to the manual of arms of a standard rifle musket; to load his weapon, a man would be required to use his teeth to tear open the paper cartridge which contained his gunpowder and shot. Poor dental health would have prevented the Civil War soldier from completing both of these very important tasks.

Tooth brushes were not commonly manufactured in the United States until the 1880s, so most Civil War soldiers resorted to primitive tools such as twigs, salt water, or simply a finger for dental care. Fillings were made of gold or tin foil for men who could afford them. Extracting teeth was an excruciating process in the 1860s, though some men who were drafted were reported to have had their teeth purposefully removed in order to evade military service.

Sources and further reading:

The Encyclopedia of Civil War Medicine, Glenna R. Schroeder-Lein, 2015.

A Manual of Instruction for Enlisting and Discharging Soldiers, Roberts Bartholow, 1863.

A History of Dentistry in the US Army to World War II, John M. Hyson et al., 2008.

04/24/2020

The English-designed Whitworth rifle was the equivalent of a sniper rifle for the field artillery due to its long range and deadly precision. Both the Union and the Confederate armies had Whitworth rifles in their arsenals, though only the Confederates used them to any significant extent on the battlefield. General Robert E. Lee had two at his disposal at the Battle of Gettysburg.

It’s unique not only for its uncanny accuracy, but for two other factors as well. First, it fired a hexagonally shaped “bolt” as opposed to a standard shot or shell, which was designed to grip the rifling inside the barrel. This was one of the factors that accounted for its accuracy- up to five miles, though at that range it was nearly impossible to see the target on many battlefields.

The other unique quality of this cannon is that it was loaded from the breech unlike most other field pieces during the War, which loaded from the muzzle. This allowed the crew to load and fire from a more concealed location, and perhaps more quickly than the crew of a Parrot rifle or other artillery piece could.

Pictured: A Whitworth rifle on Oak Hill at Gettysburg National Military Park; a Whitworth “bolt,” displaying the distinct hexagonal rifling.

04/07/2020

Though many former Confederate officers enjoyed successful careers after the war, Joseph Wheeler is the only one known to have returned to United States service and to have led troops in combat.

After gaining a sterling reputation as a cavalry commander on many Western Theater battlefields of the Civil War, Wheeler entered politics as an eight time Representative of Alabama. He was still serving in the House of Representatives when hostilities broke out with Spain in 1898.

President William McKinley appointed the 61-year-old Wheeler a Major General of Volunteers. Along with Fitzhugh Lee, “Fighting Joe” Wheeler was one of the only former Confederate officers to serve in the U.S. Army during the Spanish American War. He shipped to Cuba in command of a cavalry division which included Theodore Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, and fought in a number of battles during the war. In one highly publicized (but probably fictional) account of The Battle of Las Guasimas, General Wheeler stood in his stirrups and shouted above the noise, “Let’s go, boys! We’ve got the damn Yankees on the run again!”

After the Spanish American War, Wheeler served in the Philippines under General Arthur MacArthur, where he worked to quell the native rebellion there. In June of 1900, he earned a Brigadier General’s commission in the regular army, retiring shortly afterward in 1900.

At the 100th Anniversary of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1902, Wheeler reunited with his old Civil War colleague James Longstreet, who commented on Wheeler’s Yankee uniform.

“Joe,” said Longstreet, “I hope Almighty God takes me before he does you, for I want to be within the gates of hell to hear Jubal Early cuss you in the blue uniform.”

Wheeler died in 1906 in New York City. He is one of only two former Confederate Generals to have been buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Source:

POVALL, ALLIE. REBELS IN REPOSE Confederate Commanders after the War. S.l.: HISTORY PRESS, 2019.

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2829 Fry Rd
Jefferson, MD
21755
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