Aikido Center of Los Angeles

A not-for-profit traditional dojo dedicated to the traditions of Aikido & Iaido.

Operating as usual

05/31/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Discipline

Aikido is more than a way to defeat one’s opponents - it is a discipline. There is a difference between being disciplined and something being a discipline. “To be disciplined” or kinshin (謹慎) is “to show a controlled form of behavior or way of working.” A “discipline” or sh*tsuke (躾) is “an activity or experience that provides mental or physical training.” In order to follow a discipline like Aikido, one must be disciplined. We can be disciplined but not follow a discipline, but we cannot follow a discipline without being disciplined.

Reverend Kensho Furuya Sensei used to talk about Aikido being “a discipline.” For most of my life, I misunderstood what he was saying and thought that having discipline was the same thing as following a discipline.

When I was younger, I thought discipline was only physical and I competitively searched for the outer bounds of my physical ability and Aikido’s effectiveness. What I found was that we only find our physical limit when we have exceeded the limits of our bodies. Only after I had beat up my body did I realize that being disciplined and following a discipline was mental the whole time. Where the physical leaves off is where the true psychological journey begins. In Japanese, “to overcome psychological barriers” is dakkyou (脱境). Here, I realized it is all mental and that to follow a discipline, one must be disciplined physically and just as much or even more mentally disciplined too.

At every level of our training, we will be confronted with obstacles, barriers, and difficulties. In the beginning, all of our discomforts will present as physical problems like stamina, technical difficulties, body control, footwork, pain, etc. With each obstacle we overcome we develop tolerance and fortitude. The direct benefit that physical training gives us is that we will use that discipline to overcome the things that are confronting us mentally.

Later in our training, we will meet the four undefeated opponents: old age, old injuries, the Self, and Death. (There is a 5th but Mother Nature rarely shows up on the mat.) We will face each of these opponents in this basic order. As we age, our bodies start to give out and it is frustrating that we cannot do what we used to be able to do. When our bodies give out, those old injuries resurface and add another layer of uncomfortableness to training. This is where things really become 100% mental because this frustration and difficulty bring forth our most formidable opponent - the Self. The Self knows all of our weaknesses. We can’t really defeat the Self. O’Sensei might have advocated for self-victory but the victory he was talking about is not in defeating the Self but in having the discipline to control it. If we cannot truly defeat any of these opponents, then we have to learn to deal with them. Dealing with them is 100% mental and that fortitude only comes from following a discipline like Aikido. Learning to deal with the Self is what prepares us to face Death. Therefore, what Aikido training is really teaching us how to face Death. In the Hagakure, Yamamoto Tsunetomo wrote, “Whenever you meet difficult situations, dash forward bravely and joyfully.” The practice of Aikido as a discipline is what gives us the ability to be disciplined. With a discipline like Aikido, we can face anything that confronts us with not only bravery and eagerness but with a joyful smile. Aikido is more than a martial art; it is a discipline.

Today’s goal: Realize that everything is just a mind game that you are playing on yourself.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

EP51: How Does Age Affect Training? - The Aiki Dojo Podcast #aikidocenterla #aikidosalamancaaikikai 05/30/2024

The Aiki Dojo Podcast - How Does Age Affect Training?

In Episode 51 of the Aiki Dojo Podcast, we discuss the role age and aging and how it affects training. On a certain level, age is just a mindset. Those who think they can, will. Those who think they can’t, won’t. Tune into the discussion on how age affects Aikido training.

Enjoy!

Watch here: https://youtu.be/THKhU9rxK3c

Listen to it here: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/aikidojo/episodes/How-Does-Age-Affect-Training-e2ka124

The Aiki Dojo Podcast’s goal is to translate traditional Aikido and traditional martial arts training into the modern world. The podcast is hosted by David Ito Sensei who is the Chief Instructor of the Aikido Center of Los Angeles and he brings brings over 30 years of Aikido training to the podcast. The podcast is co-hosted by Ken Watanabe Shihan, Mike Van Ruth, Aikido 4th Dan, and Bill D'Angelo, Aikido 4th Dan. Let us know if you have a topic that you would like Ito Sensei and the team to discuss in the next podcast.

You can also listen to this podcast on iTunes or Spotify or wherever you download your podcasts.

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

EP51: How Does Age Affect Training? - The Aiki Dojo Podcast #aikidocenterla #aikidosalamancaaikikai The Aiki Dojo Podcast - How Does Age Affect Training?In Episode 51 of the Aiki Dojo Podcast, we discuss the role age and aging and how it affects training. O...

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/24/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Empowerment

“Life is growth. If we stop growing, technically and spiritually, we are as good as dead.” - Quote attributed to Morihei Ueshiba

Aikido is a journey of self-empowerment through constant pursuit of knowledge and balance, as we refine ourselves and grow stronger with each challenge we face.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Click the link in our Bio to read the entire blog post.

.budokan

05/24/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Empowerment

“Life is growth. If we stop growing, technically and spiritually, we are as good as dead.” - Quote attributed to Morihei Ueshiba

An Aikidoist is a seeker. A seeker is someone who is searching for knowledge. When we talk about training, we often use the word shugyo (修業) and most think that it means “austere or hard training” like in mushashugyo (武者修行) or “warrior training.” However, if we look up shugyo in the dictionary, it means “pursuit of knowledge.” The pursuit of knowledge is the search for empowerment. Empowerment is “the process of becoming stronger and more confident, especially in controlling one's life and claiming one's rights.”

Self-empowerment is not a place we arrive at. Empowerment is a constant cycle of self-refinement where we discover, learn, and refine ourselves. Reverend Kensho Furuya Sensei once wrote, “If you have a problem in your training, you simply work at it until you have mastered it. Once you have mastered it, you move on to your next obstacle and work on it until you master it. This is a continuous and endless process. In your lifetime, there will be many battles that you will face and conquer, and this is endless. As you gain experience however, you will find that you understand your situation better and become more accepting of each challenge as it comes your way, and you begin to welcome these encounters. This understanding is actually the growing of energy within you. Some people like to call this empowerment.”

In a traditional dojo, the floors are wiped down before or after class. The students do this with a dampened cloth. Dampened means wet enough to clean the floor but dry enough so that the water on the floor afterwards evaporates quickly. Too much water will cause the floor to stay wet too long and create mold and mildew. Too dry and it won’t clean the mat. Damp in this sense is a delicate balance. When we wring the towel, we are supposed to use a shibori grip (絞り) or one hand over the other which is similar to how we grip a sword. Holding and wringing the towel vertically this way is supposed to be tidier because the water drips down and not out, but it is also supposed to help us develop our grip. The “wringing of the towel” is also a metaphor. Shiborikomi (絞り込み) means “refinement” or “to narrow-down.” Thus, as we wring out the water, we are also refining ourselves. In cleaning, we are trying to find the perfect balance between wet and dry. In training, we are also trying to find the perfect balance between warrior and human being. Furuya Sensei called this balance saikan koubai (歳寒紅梅) or “the elegant apricot flower and the strong plum blossom.” He said, “Saikan koubai means to focus too much on war makes us rough and crude while the emphasis on too much beauty makes us weak.”

There is a thin line between empowerment and delusion. The only thing which staves off delusion is constant refinement and that is why O’Sensei implores us to never stop growing. Knowing oneself is true power and that is why a true Aikidoist seeks to know.

Today’s goal: Knowing requires learning and learning requires humility. Be humble and seek to know.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/20/2024

This article by David Ito Sensei originally appeared in the Spanish language magazine El Budoka 2.0 and was translated by Santiago Almaraz Sensei of Aikido Kodokai Salamanca- España.

Never be Defeated

In the martial arts, we can fail or lose but we should never allow ourselves to be defeated.

To fail is defined as “being unsuccessful in achieving one's goal” while to lose is “to fail to win.” To be defeated is also defined as “to have been beaten in a battle or other contest” but it also can mean “to be demoralized and overcome by adversity.” On a certain level, failure, losing, and defeat are all the same. However, failure and losing are external but being defeated has this internal quality to it.

In the martial arts, we are all trying to reach a place where we are mukautokorotekinashi (向かう所敵なし) or “undefeatable.” Mukautokorotekinashi literally translates to mean “to go to a place where no opponent exists.” Understanding this, that’s why teachers like Morihei Ueshiba advocated for masakatsu agatsu (正勝吾勝) or that “the true victory is self victory.” To realize the true meaning of undefeatable takes a long time. Only after we have fought virtually every person on Earth, do we realize that the only true opponent is ourselves and thus we realize that to be undefeatable is really just a mindset that we strive for.

Because it is a mindset, one way to look at it is that we are trying to cultivate a certain type of willpower called konjo (根性). In Japanese, konjo is defined as “willpower,” but it is supposed to mean “fighting spirit.” Itzik Zur wrote that “Fighting Spirit is a supreme and revered expression of the human soul’s ability to overcome, transcend, and attain the unattainable.” Fighting spirit is the inner strength or willpower that we draw upon to overcome adversity and never give up.

To be truly undefeatable has three components that we must unify. In swordsmanship, this unification is sometimes referred to as kikentaiichi (氣剣体一致) or “the spirit, sword, and body as one.” In other words, when this unification occurs (body, technique and mind/spirit), a person isn’t easily defeated. This is what people refer to as “having heart.”

The body and sword represent the outer aspects of our fighting spirit. Body refers to the hardening and conditioning of our external bodies and sword alludes to technique. American Army General George Patton once said, “Fatigue makes cowards of us all.” What Patton is referring to is that the outer aspects of one’s fighting spirit are the basis for fighting spirit and are intertwined. If our bodies fatigue, then our technique will soon fail and if we don’t have technique, then our bodies will overwork and soon succumb to fatigue. When the outer aspects of our fighting spirit fail then we have to rely on our minds or spirits.

The spiritual part is last and truest aspect of fighting spirit which is also the most difficult to cultivate. True fighting spirit is a spiritual type of willpower where one is so determined to win that even if they are on the verge of death, they will still try to defeat you. We’ve all seen it in movies as the hero who is beaten half to death still stands back up, wipes the blood from his brow and dives into the fray one last time. We also see this understanding written in the Hagakure where Yamamoto Tsunetomo wrote: “Even if a samurai’s head were to be suddenly cut off, he should still be able to perform one more action with certainty. With martial valor in his life; if he can make himself to be like a revengeful ghost and show great determination, though his head be cut off, he should not die.”

Some people think that fighting spirit is something that we either have or we don’t. I don’t think that is entirely true. I believe that every person has fighting spirit but most don’t know how to activate it or cultivate it. In Japanese, it is said that young people have iji (意地) or “willfulness” and that it is the job of the teacher to channel that obstinacy and transform it into the konjo or “fighting spirit.”

The teachers of old believed that the key to fighting spirit is in the body and likened its development to the sword. In the beginning the sword is too heavy to pick up let alone to wield. Later, with time and conditioning, we are able to pick it up and swing it. Once we are able to wield it with ease, we use it to make inroads into our minds and spirits. As we forge ourselves outwardly and inwardly, the sword ceases to be and the only thing left is the warrior who’s mind and spirit are the weapon.

Some believe that fighting spirit is in the body and has to be let out. The way we let it loose begins with physical training. The easiest way to do this is by following Judo legend Masahiko Kimura’s san bai no do ryoku (三倍努力) or “Tripling one's effort.” Kimura was renowned for his incredible work ethic of outworking his opponents and he never wanted to be outdone. He is widely remembered as the person who would regularly give out 10 concussions a training session. Kimura also won the All-Japan Judo Championships three times in a row and didn’t lose a judo match from 1936 to 1950. During his competitive era, he would train 10 and a half hours every day and in his retirement, he cut it down to eight. Kimura famous training mantra was “Tripling effort!” He once said, “If my opponent trains for one hour, I will train for three.” He was known for his brutal workouts which included 1000 push-ups a day and practicing 3,000 foot sweeps per leg every training session. Kimura’s training prowess is so prolific that there is a saying in Judo: “No one before Kimura, no one after.” Kimura’s tripling effort first began as a competition with others as he never wanted to be outdone. However, to truly put in triple the effort takes willpower and that’s how Kimura knowingly or unknowingly taught himself fighting spirit and became the greatest Judoka that ever lived.

Every good martial artist is supposed to have toushimanman (闘志満々) or “a strong will to fight.” However, the will we are talking about is the will to not be overtaken by by the demoralization of defeat. I truly believe that every person has fighting spirit - some just need to find it. Morihei Ueshiba said, “The purpose of training is to tighten up the slack, toughen the body, and polish the spirit.” Thus, every person has the power to cultivate fighting spirit and martial arts training is the vehicle we use to find it, develop it, and use it. The best martial artists may fail or even lose, but they never allow themselves to fall victim to defeat.

Read it here in Spanish:https://www.elbudoka.es/revista/budoka78.pdf =68

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/19/2024

Little Tokyo Sparkle 2024. Thanks to everyone who showed up and represent Ed for the Aikido Center of Los Angeles. .budokan

05/17/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Happier

“This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.” - Kambei Shimada, Seven Samurai

Aikido people are happier people.

In the 1954 Akira Kurosawa classic Seven Samurai there is this scene that I think about a lot. The leader of the seven samurai, Kambei Shimada tersely rebukes the villagers who want to sacrifice the outlying villager’s homes to save the main village. While talking about his own experiences and trying to convince the villagers not to be selfish, he says, “This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.”

I recently read an article on CNBC about happiness which made me think about Kambei’s assertion. The article was about happiness, and it interviewed Author Stephanie Harrison who wrote the book New Happy. What she found was that “money and success are not the keys to happiness.” Furthermore, she stated, “I think the secret to happiness is using who you are to help other people. To do that, you have to discover who you are, who you really are, away from the conditioning that we’ve been given by our society. And then you have to figure out the best ways to share that self with other people.”

From this article, I thought about Aikido and how training could make Aikido people happier people. Happier begins with ukemi. Early in our training, we are forced to take ukemi for our partners. It is forced because we do it because we are told to, not because we want to. Later in our training, when we become more confident in our ability to fall or receive a throw or pin, we actually come to enjoy taking ukemi. One reason why we enjoy it is because we have developed our physical ability and know we aren’t going to get hurt. Another and more deeper reason is because as Reverend Kensho Furuya Sensei used to say “training is how we gain enlightenment” and so by allowing others to use our bodies, we are helping them toward their enlightenment.

Obviously, helping others toward enlightenment is not typically on the forefront of our minds. But, over time, the training subconsciously changes us into better and kinder human beings. One indication that it is developing us is that we start to display patterns of selflessness. In Japanese, this selflessness is te wo sashinoberu (手を差し伸べる) or “to lend a hand” but it is helping without being prompted. Anyone can look selfless one or twice especially when they know someone is watching, but true selflessness is a pattern. This pattern is unknowingly drummed into us with every act of ukemi, when we clean, or anytime we help out. With every act, we somehow become more giving and kinder people - we become happier. This giving of ourselves supports Harrison’s understanding that to become happier, we must help others.

Aikido is not happiness nor are all Aikido people living in states of happiness. The operative word in the article was “happier.” Every day in life and Aikido, we are confronted with things that are out of our control. The unhappy person takes it out on others. Through Aikido training, the developed Aikidoist knows that they can’t change the circumstances, but they can change how they react. Aikido teaches us to be less selfish and think of others which science is now realizing helps us to be happier. Thus, Aikido people are happier people.

Today’s goal: Lend a helping hand to someone else in need - it will make you happier.

Read the article here: https://www.cnbc.com/2024/05/16/this-is-the-secret-to-happiness-from-a-happiness-researcher.html

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/15/2024

The May issue of the Aiki Dojo Newsletter is now available online.

Click here to view it in English
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5744da899f7266e1f35c57f4/t/6644c7fe81b2bc0b7bead38e/1715783680903/ACLA+Newsletter+Mays+2024+PDF.pdf

Click here to view it in Spanish
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5744da899f7266e1f35c57f4/t/6644c84db9872e6523f3ddeb/1715783758081/ACLA+Newsletter+May+en+Spanish+2024+PDF+%281%29.pdf

Also, you can view every newsletter going back to 1985 here as well. https://aikidocenterla.com/newsletter

Enjoy!

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/13/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Finesse

The best Aikidoists focus on finesse.

Embracing finesse over brute force in Aikido teaches us patience and emphasizes technique, making our lives smoother and less painful.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Click the link in our Bio to read the entire blog post.

.budokan

05/13/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Finesse

The best Aikidoists focus on finesse. In Japanese “to finesse” the technique is gikou (技巧). Finesse takes time but if we can learn to not force things then our lives become less difficult or wildly less painful.

When I was younger, I wanted to be a motorcycle mechanic. During my apprenticeship, whenever I would struggle and start to get rough with a piece of equipment or try forcing a part in, the head mechanic would shout out, “If it doesn’t fit, force it!” and start laughing with all the other mechanics. Every time I see someone get rough or force something, I remember that old biker mechanic, who coincidentally, was missing a few fingers because he told me that he used to force things too until he learned to use technique instead of brute strength.

In class, there is a tendency for mid-level students to kojiireru (抉じ入れる) or “force” their techniques. This is just the stage that every student has to get through. At this level, faster means rougher, slower means rougher, turning your hip means rougher, etc. It is almost comical because no matter what correction you give them, they can only hear or only do rougher. Interestingly, another way to say “force it” in Japanese is gorioshi (ゴリ押し). Gorioshi is a half japanized word where oshi means to push and gori might be short for gorilla. Therefore, those that “force it” are pushing it like a gorilla. Like a gorilla, the mid-level student can’t really hear or understand the teacher’s correction so instead they just resort to using udezumou (腕相撲) or “brute strength.” Brute strength is the hallmark of a mid-level Aikidoist. Later, after many dustups that leave us with even more bumps and bruises, students learn to calm down and focus on finessing the techniques.

Finessing the technique means that we tadashiiokonai (正しい行い) or “doing the right thing” at the right time. In every technique there is a specific time that requires a specific amount of leverage. Outside of that time and place, we run the risk of having to use brute force. What separates the beginner from the expert is the expert’s ability to rely on technique over brute force. There is no easy way to get through this phase in our training - it takes patience and humility. Patience is the price that we pay to gain mastery. Forcing our techniques could cause our partners to get injured or at the very least be uncomfortable as we force our way through it. Humility is realizing that we have done something wrong and have the ability to apologize. When we have acquired humility, then we will have cleared this stage in our training. From my own experience, I know that patience and humility both take time to cultivate. Until then, “If it doesn’t fit, force it.”

In Aikido and life, everything we do is about finesse from dealing with our co-workers to throwing our partners down. No one wants to be on the receiving end of someone trying to force it, no matter what it is. The best Aikidoists have gained the skill to realize that if something doesn’t fit, we calm down, take a breath, and finesse it.

Today’s goal: Everything requires patience. Slow down, take a breath and don’t force it.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

05/10/2024

Way to go Google. I didn't think anything I wrote would cause anyone extreme feelings. But, spew all the hate and negativity in the comments and google, FB, IG or anyone else profiting off of those controversies seems to care.

Photos from Aikido Center of Los Angeles's post 05/10/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Change Your Mind

The best Aikidoists are good at changing their minds.

Aikido practice is not just about improving physical movement - it’s about becoming better human beings. It said that the mind leads the body and thus everything we do stems from how we think. A person who studies Aikido understands this and that is why the best Aikidoists are good at changing their minds because if we can change our minds, we can change our lives.

Click the link in our Bio to read the entire blog post.

.budokan

05/10/2024

Aiki Dojo Message - Change Your Mind

The best Aikidoists are good at changing their minds.

In Japanese, one way to say “to change one's mind” is kigakawaru (氣が変わる). Kigakawaru literally translates to mean “to change one’s energy.” To be able to change one’s ki (氣) or “energy” is to be able to change one’s life.

It is said that Aikido is moving meditation. What that means is that through the repetitiveness of the movement, we can reach a higher mental state of consciousness. In our normal everyday lives, our minds are in a beta state or a heightened state of arousal which is associated with concentration and fight or flight. With the repetitive nature of Aikido training, we are able to shift our minds into a theta state. Theta is the state of mind associated with REM sleep, creativity, unconscious behavior, super learning, and the unconscious mind. It is the same state that we reach while engaged in seated meditating and when athletes are “in the zone.” It supposedly can take up to seven minutes for our minds to switch from beta to theta. Theoretically, the more we train, the faster we can get into theta. It is in theta that we can supposedly gain access to our unconscious minds and make changes to our ways of thinking, personalities, character, etc.

O’Sensei began every class with tenkan. Reverend Kensho Furuya Sensei said something to the effect that everything we need to learn in Aikido is encompassed in the practice of tenkan. On the surface, tenkan teach us things like body movement, coordination, and connection. On a deeper level, tenkan can also teaches us higher consciousness concepts like patience, perseverance, and compassion to name just a few. That is why in my dojo, I let tenkan go on a little bit too long, possibly 5-7 minutes. I do this because not only is tenkan teaching students movement, but I am also hoping that the students can calm down and get into a theta state of mind which will help them learn faster in the rest of the class. Once students realize or learn how to put themselves into a theta state of mind in class, it becomes easier to reach theta in their daily lives and they can change other aspects of their consciousness or in other words change their minds.

This is where the idea that studying Aikido makes you a better person comes into play. Aikido techniques are metaphoric. What this means is that the techniques are the physical representations of higher philosophical concepts like compassion, empathy, restraint, etc. Therefore, every time we are in a theta state and we throw a person down and we demonstrate restraint and care for our partner’s wellbeing, we are unknowingly practicing to be kinder, empathetic, and more compassionate human beings.

A person who studies Aikido is a seeker. A seeker is a person who strives to know, change, and grow. When we know who we are and understand our tendencies, we look for things that we need to change so that we can grow. Aikido practice is not just about improving physical movement - it’s about becoming better human beings. It said that the mind leads the body and thus everything we do stems from how we think. A person who studies Aikido understands this and that is why the best Aikidoists are good at changing their minds because if we can change our minds, we can change our lives.

Today’s goal: Right or wrong, good or bad are just judgements. True power lies in the ability to change our minds.

This post appears in a slightly different form @ www.aikidocenterla.com/blog

Terasaki Budokan - Little Tokyo Service Center

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1211 N. Main Street
Los Angeles, CA
90012

Opening Hours

Monday 6:30am - 7:30am
5:15pm - 8pm
Tuesday 6pm - 9pm
Wednesday 6:30am - 7:30am
5:15pm - 9am
Thursday 8am - 9pm
Friday 6:30am - 7:30pm
6:30pm - 9pm
Saturday 9am - 11:45am
Sunday 9am - 2pm

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Hye Katch Do offers classes for All Ages: Martial Arts, Self Defense, Kickboxing, MMA ,Karate,Krav Maga , Judo, Jiu-Jitsu,Body Conditioning,

MIWSD - MAGDA INSTITUTE WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE MIWSD - MAGDA INSTITUTE WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE
7255 Canby Avenue
Los Angeles, 91335

MIWSD - MAGDA INSTITUTE WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE Premium World Class Women's Self-Defense Training Main HQ: Los Angeles, CA Branches Worldwide

Tae Ryong Taekwondo School Los Angeles Tae Ryong Taekwondo School Los Angeles
2314 Westwood Boulevard
Los Angeles, 90064

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KMA: Black Belt Champions KMA: Black Belt Champions
5524 Van Nuys Boulevard
Los Angeles, 91401

OUR MISSION: to develop oneself physically, mentally, spiritually, and have good character.