Train with Susan

Personal and small group training for women only. Specializing in: Women over 50, Nutrition, Weight

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Health and Strength Keep You, and Your Life, Balanced 10/06/2021

Health and Strength Keep You, and Your Life, Balanced

Health and Strength Keep You, and Your Life, Balanced Throughout your life, you’ve probably had period where you felt like everything was in balance. You were healthy. Your relationships were strong. Your career was going well… And, if you’re like mos…

[10/05/21]   Get Fit Newsletter

Avoid these foods to lose weight
You probably consider yourself to be a healthy person, but do you really have healthy food in your kitchen? You’d be surprised how many fattening foods you’re still buying and eating. Here are 7 foods you should lose from your kitchen immediately…

1. Breakfast Cereal

It’s delicious, it’s easy to prepare, and sometimes it even gives you enough energy to get to lunchtime. Unfortunately, breakfast cereal is often jam-packed with extra sugars that will do more to drag you down than build you up for your day. Prefer the flavorless kinds? Then be ready to be hungry soon, as they often don’t provide enough good calories to fill you up for long. Still hungry for a bowl of cereal? Consider this: they’re one of the most processed foods on the market.

2. Flavored Yogurt

Yes, flavored yogurt tastes much better than its plain peers, but going with a pre-flavored yogurt will instantly double the amount of sugar you consume. Fortunately, overcoming the flavorless thing can be done healthily. All you have to do is add chopped, fresh fruit of your choice and enjoy!

3. Frozen Entrees

It’s hard to believe how many people rely on frozen TV dinners on a regular basis. If you’re a frozen believer, it’s time to put your health before convenience. On top of frequently lacking all the vitamins and minerals you need for optimal health, frozen dinners often ooze with trans-fats and sodium. This means that while your palate may be pleased, your waist, arteries, and heart will not.

4. Diet Soda

One of the most dangerous items to ever be invented was the diet soda. By trimming certain things from the ingredients list, soda manufacturers guaranteed a giant market share, consisting largely of people who are attempting to be health conscious. Unfortunately, diet soda messes with your body’s ability to recognize and manage sugar properly. And while diet drinks may be calorie-free, those who drink them are at a much greater risk for weight gain than those who do not.

5. Popcorn

No, all popcorn is not to be avoided at all costs. But more than likely, a lot of the unpopped kernels in your kitchen should be ditched. Here’s a good way to determine if your popcorn is at war with your good health. Is it in a prepackaged bag that simply has to be tossed in the microwave to be cooked? Then stay away! Those prepackaged popcorn packages, whether lightly buttered, drowning in butter, or candied, offer no benefit. If you’re going to do popcorn, you’ll need to pop it the old-fashioned way, preferably via air popping.

6. “Skinny” Desserts

The word “skinny” is alluring. It’s what you want to achieve. However, these diet dessert are often filled with artificial ingredients and sugars that are keeping you stuck with your fat loss.

7. Granola Bars

Enjoyed by healthy hikers around the world, granola bars are the final unexpected bad choice in your kitchen. This one may have you scratching your head when you consider that your favorite kind is crammed with every fruit and nut you can imagine. But read the ingredient label and you’ll soon see that there is probably more sugar—make that high-fructose corn syrup—than goodness your body can use. Are you ready to ditch the unhealthy items from your kitchen in order to take your fitness to the next level? Would you like to know without a shadow of a doubt that you are going to lose weight in the coming months?

It’s my goal to see you achieve greatness. I believe that you’ve got what it takes.

It’s so simple. Call or email today to get started on a program that will improve your health and well being, and will get you amazing results.

Train With Susan
323-574-4802

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You Get Out What You Put In
Like anything else in life, when it comes to your exercise routine you get out what you put in. Just going through the motions isn’t good enough.

For real results, push your intensity in each workout. Remind yourself that it’s only a small portion of your day, and that you can do it. Dig down deep and give it all you have.

Easy Turkey Meatloaf

You don’t need to be a chef to whip together this delicious, nutritious meal—it’s quick and easy. Organic turkey is a great source of protein. Pair this meatloaf with a fresh, green salad for the perfect, fitness-approved meal.

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

What you need
Servings: 12

2 teaspoons olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 yellow onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 Tablespoon tomato paste
2 omega-3 rich eggs
2.5 pounds organic, ground turkey
1 cup natural ketchup (no sugar or corn syrup)

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Lightly grease a small casserole pan with olive oil.

2. Place a skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil, garlic, onions and peppers. Sauté until soft, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

3. Add the spices, tomato paste, eggs and turkey. Mix well then transfer to the prepared pan, shaping into a loaf. Pour the ketchup evenly over the top of your loaf. Bake for 90 minutes, and until no longer pink in the center.

Nutrition
One serving equals: 146 calories, 2g fat, 322mg sodium, 5g carbohydrate, .5g fiber, and 25g protein

09/29/2021

Staying Fit to Function in Everyday Life

You already know lots of reasons why you should exercise regularly.

And maybe you shake your head and say, “Not for me.” Of course you want to look, feel, and move better; manage your blood pressure; prevent Type 2 diabetes, etc. However, you don’t feel like putting in the effort to exercise.

But have you thought about being able to stand up from a chair or the toilet? About carrying in your groceries? About countless other activities of everyday life that rely on strength?

Most people don’t. They still think people go to the gym to get big muscles. And some do, of course – and that’s great.

But everybody should care about being able to care for themselves and maintain independence for as long as possible.

So consider an idea called functional fitness. It keeps you prepared for activities of everyday life, including stamina to run errands and play with the grandkids without losing your breath.

Functional fitness is increasingly popular with all kinds of people, including those over 50 who want to maintain their independence and quality of life without spending countless hours in a gym.

As WebMD puts it, functional fitness is “about training your body to handle real-life situations.” That means exercises focused on “building a body capable of doing real-life activities in real-life positions, not just lifting a certain amount of weight in an idealized posture created by a gym machine.”

Does functional fitness sound like a good idea for you? I’m here to help you with safe, functional programs to boost your fitness, confidence and enjoyment of daily life.

Staying Fit to Function in Everyday Life

You already know lots of reasons why you should exercise regularly.

And maybe you shake your head and say, “Not for me.” Of course you want to look, feel, and move better; manage your blood pressure; prevent Type 2 diabetes, etc. However, you don’t feel like putting in the effort to exercise.

But have you thought about being able to stand up from a chair or the toilet? About carrying in your groceries? About countless other activities of everyday life that rely on strength?

Most people don’t. They still think people go to the gym to get big muscles. And some do, of course – and that’s great.

But everybody should care about being able to care for themselves and maintain independence for as long as possible.

So consider an idea called functional fitness. It keeps you prepared for activities of everyday life, including stamina to run errands and play with the grandkids without losing your breath.

Functional fitness is increasingly popular with all kinds of people, including those over 50 who want to maintain their independence and quality of life without spending countless hours in a gym.

As WebMD puts it, functional fitness is “about training your body to handle real-life situations.” That means exercises focused on “building a body capable of doing real-life activities in real-life positions, not just lifting a certain amount of weight in an idealized posture created by a gym machine.”

Does functional fitness sound like a good idea for you? I’m here to help you with safe, functional programs to boost your fitness, confidence and enjoyment of daily life.

8 Strategies to Help You Take More Steps During Your Day - Aaptiv 09/28/2021

8 Strategies to Help You Take More Steps During Your Day - Aaptiv

Are you trying to put more steps into your day? Here are some easy ways to help you get to your 10,000 steps.

8 Strategies to Help You Take More Steps During Your Day - Aaptiv Looking for ways to incorporate exercise and take more steps during your daily routine without feeling like you have to designate a significant amount of time and energy towards it? Here, fitness experts share their best strategies for sneaking more steps into your day.

Train with Susan Newsletter 09/27/2021

Train with Susan Newsletter

Train with Susan Newsletter There is one reason why most people haven’t yet reached their goals, and it’s a simple one. It’s something that I’ve struggled in the past, and it just may be the one thing that’s holding you back from your big breakthrough.

The Benefits of Following a Plant-based Diet 09/26/2021

The Benefits of Following a Plant-based Diet

Many people are promoting a plant based diet. Here are some benefits.

The Benefits of Following a Plant-based Diet Going vegetarian can improve your health and reduce your risk of certain diseases.

09/23/2021

How Exercise Helps During and After Menopause

Selene Yeager was in her late 40s when she started noticing strange changes in her body and mood.

A lifelong competitive athlete, Selene noticed that her training wasn’t having its usual effect. She had night sweats and anxiety, but she brushed it all off.

She learned later that she had begun going through menopause. Now she is devoted to helping women understand what menopause does to their bodies and brains, and how exercise helps lessen circumstances and improve overall health later in life.

“I didn’t know what was going on, and that is true for a lot of women,” Selene, a writer and trainer, and podcast host now in her 50s. “We’re in 2021, and it’s still radical to talk about menopause. Something got to change.”

In addition to hormonal changes, many women experience mood swings, trouble sleeping, brain fog, and more. Bone density diminishes, which can be especially troubling since all people lose muscle mass as we age. Weak muscles and bones can often mean falls and fractures. Also, women can have trouble with tummy fat and a higher risk of heart disease after menopause.

“Exercise is the best medicine for all kinds of changes that women are going through at this time,” says Selene, who leads the Feisty Menopause movement and hosts its Press Play Not Pause podcast.

Why Exercise Is So Important Now

Exercise works by improving muscle mass, strength, balance and coordination, according to the National Institutes of Health and other experts

“Research indicates that postmenopausal women who engage in the comprehensive exercise program, benefit by maintaining a healthy body, bone density levels, and good mental health,” the government agency says. “Osteoporosis, the greatest ailment in older women, can be kept under control with exercise.

“Even a moderate exercise schedule can not only keep the weight in check, but it also lowers the risk of stress, anxiety, and depression, all of which tend to show up liberally during and beyond menopause.”

As for hot flashes, though? Well, “the role of exercise, however, in hot flashes remains inconclusive.”

Lifting Weights Is Particularly Helpful

Medical and fitness experts cite many studies (including one in the Journal of the American Medical Association) saying that women can reduce body fat, increase muscle mass, build up bones, and improve balance by lifting moderately heavy weights on a regular basis.

I agree, of course. And so does Selene. (And no, you won’t get big and bulky!)

“Without the anabolic stimulation of estrogen, you need to make up the difference, and lifting weights does it,” she says. “Women in this age category need to lift weights, and they’re not being told that enough. And they need people to teach them becaHow Exercise Helps During and After Menopause

​menopausepic-2.jpg

Selene Yeager was in her late 40s when she started noticing strange changes in her body and mood.

A lifelong competitive athlete, Selene noticed that her training wasn’t having its usual effect. She had night sweats and anxiety, but she brushed it all off.

She learned later that she had begun going through menopause. Now she is devoted to helping women understand what menopause does to their bodies and brains, and how exercise helps lessen circumstances and improve overall health later in life.

“I didn’t know what was going on, and that is true for a lot of women,” Selene, a writer and trainer, and podcast host now in her 50s. “We’re in 2021, and it’s still radical to talk about menopause. Something got to change.”

In addition to hormonal changes, many women experience mood swings, trouble sleeping, brain fog, and more. Bone density diminishes, which can be especially troubling since all people lose muscle mass as we age. Weak muscles and bones can often mean falls and fractures. Also, women can have trouble with tummy fat and a higher risk of heart disease after menopause.

“Exercise is the best medicine for all kinds of changes that women are going through at this time,” says Selene, who leads the Feisty Menopause movement and hosts its Press Play Not Pause podcast.

Why Exercise Is So Important Now

Exercise works by improving muscle mass, strength, balance and coordination, according to the National Institutes of Health and other experts

“Research indicates that postmenopausal women who engage in the comprehensive exercise program, benefit by maintaining a healthy body, bone density levels, and good mental health,” the government agency says. “Osteoporosis, the greatest ailment in older women, can be kept under control with exercise.

“Even a moderate exercise schedule can not only keep the weight in check, but it also lowers the risk of stress, anxiety, and depression, all of which tend to show up liberally during and beyond menopause.”

As for hot flashes, though? Well, “the role of exercise, however, in hot flashes remains inconclusive.”

Lifting Weights Is Particularly Helpful

Medical and fitness experts cite many studies (including one in the Journal of the American Medical Association) saying that women can reduce body fat, increase muscle mass, build up bones, and improve balance by lifting moderately heavy weights on a regular basis.

I agree, of course. And so does Selene. (And no, you won’t get big and bulky!)

“Without the anabolic stimulation of estrogen, you need to make up the difference, and lifting weights does it,” she says. “Women in this age category need to lift weights, and they’re not being told that enough. And they need people to teach them because of lot of them haven’t been shown.”

Let me show you how effective, safe and fun resistance training is – and how to integrate it into a healthy lifestyle no matter your age or gender.

And if you have questions about menopause, please talk to your doctor.

>Additional sources: The Department of Health & Human Services; WebMD; The American College of Sports Medicine.use of lot of them haven’t been shown.”

Let me show you how effective, safe and fun resistance training is – and how to integrate it into a healthy lifestyle no matter your age or gender.

And if you have questions about menopause, please talk to your doctor.

>Additional sources: The Department of Health & Human Services; WebMD; The American College of Sports Medicine.

How Exercise Helps During and After Menopause

Selene Yeager was in her late 40s when she started noticing strange changes in her body and mood.

A lifelong competitive athlete, Selene noticed that her training wasn’t having its usual effect. She had night sweats and anxiety, but she brushed it all off.

She learned later that she had begun going through menopause. Now she is devoted to helping women understand what menopause does to their bodies and brains, and how exercise helps lessen circumstances and improve overall health later in life.

“I didn’t know what was going on, and that is true for a lot of women,” Selene, a writer and trainer, and podcast host now in her 50s. “We’re in 2021, and it’s still radical to talk about menopause. Something got to change.”

In addition to hormonal changes, many women experience mood swings, trouble sleeping, brain fog, and more. Bone density diminishes, which can be especially troubling since all people lose muscle mass as we age. Weak muscles and bones can often mean falls and fractures. Also, women can have trouble with tummy fat and a higher risk of heart disease after menopause.

“Exercise is the best medicine for all kinds of changes that women are going through at this time,” says Selene, who leads the Feisty Menopause movement and hosts its Press Play Not Pause podcast.

Why Exercise Is So Important Now

Exercise works by improving muscle mass, strength, balance and coordination, according to the National Institutes of Health and other experts

“Research indicates that postmenopausal women who engage in the comprehensive exercise program, benefit by maintaining a healthy body, bone density levels, and good mental health,” the government agency says. “Osteoporosis, the greatest ailment in older women, can be kept under control with exercise.

“Even a moderate exercise schedule can not only keep the weight in check, but it also lowers the risk of stress, anxiety, and depression, all of which tend to show up liberally during and beyond menopause.”

As for hot flashes, though? Well, “the role of exercise, however, in hot flashes remains inconclusive.”

Lifting Weights Is Particularly Helpful

Medical and fitness experts cite many studies (including one in the Journal of the American Medical Association) saying that women can reduce body fat, increase muscle mass, build up bones, and improve balance by lifting moderately heavy weights on a regular basis.

I agree, of course. And so does Selene. (And no, you won’t get big and bulky!)

“Without the anabolic stimulation of estrogen, you need to make up the difference, and lifting weights does it,” she says. “Women in this age category need to lift weights, and they’re not being told that enough. And they need people to teach them becaHow Exercise Helps During and After Menopause

​menopausepic-2.jpg

Selene Yeager was in her late 40s when she started noticing strange changes in her body and mood.

A lifelong competitive athlete, Selene noticed that her training wasn’t having its usual effect. She had night sweats and anxiety, but she brushed it all off.

She learned later that she had begun going through menopause. Now she is devoted to helping women understand what menopause does to their bodies and brains, and how exercise helps lessen circumstances and improve overall health later in life.

“I didn’t know what was going on, and that is true for a lot of women,” Selene, a writer and trainer, and podcast host now in her 50s. “We’re in 2021, and it’s still radical to talk about menopause. Something got to change.”

In addition to hormonal changes, many women experience mood swings, trouble sleeping, brain fog, and more. Bone density diminishes, which can be especially troubling since all people lose muscle mass as we age. Weak muscles and bones can often mean falls and fractures. Also, women can have trouble with tummy fat and a higher risk of heart disease after menopause.

“Exercise is the best medicine for all kinds of changes that women are going through at this time,” says Selene, who leads the Feisty Menopause movement and hosts its Press Play Not Pause podcast.

Why Exercise Is So Important Now

Exercise works by improving muscle mass, strength, balance and coordination, according to the National Institutes of Health and other experts

“Research indicates that postmenopausal women who engage in the comprehensive exercise program, benefit by maintaining a healthy body, bone density levels, and good mental health,” the government agency says. “Osteoporosis, the greatest ailment in older women, can be kept under control with exercise.

“Even a moderate exercise schedule can not only keep the weight in check, but it also lowers the risk of stress, anxiety, and depression, all of which tend to show up liberally during and beyond menopause.”

As for hot flashes, though? Well, “the role of exercise, however, in hot flashes remains inconclusive.”

Lifting Weights Is Particularly Helpful

Medical and fitness experts cite many studies (including one in the Journal of the American Medical Association) saying that women can reduce body fat, increase muscle mass, build up bones, and improve balance by lifting moderately heavy weights on a regular basis.

I agree, of course. And so does Selene. (And no, you won’t get big and bulky!)

“Without the anabolic stimulation of estrogen, you need to make up the difference, and lifting weights does it,” she says. “Women in this age category need to lift weights, and they’re not being told that enough. And they need people to teach them because of lot of them haven’t been shown.”

Let me show you how effective, safe and fun resistance training is – and how to integrate it into a healthy lifestyle no matter your age or gender.

And if you have questions about menopause, please talk to your doctor.

>Additional sources: The Department of Health & Human Services; WebMD; The American College of Sports Medicine.use of lot of them haven’t been shown.”

Let me show you how effective, safe and fun resistance training is – and how to integrate it into a healthy lifestyle no matter your age or gender.

And if you have questions about menopause, please talk to your doctor.

>Additional sources: The Department of Health & Human Services; WebMD; The American College of Sports Medicine.

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Loving my new ActivMotion Bar! It’s been helpful with my clients working on their balance and contributing to their core...

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